4 or smaller digit ASNs

Richard Hicks richard.hicks at gmail.com
Thu Oct 12 22:53:07 CST 2017


Anyone know the history behind ASN 2906 (Netflix)?
How did they get a number that low?

Rick

On Thu, Oct 12, 2017 at 3:13 PM, Jon Lewis <jlewis at lewis.org> wrote:

> On Thu, 12 Oct 2017, Hank Nussbacher wrote:
>
> On 12/10/2017 08:47, Mel Beckman wrote:
>>
>>> James,
>>>
>>> As far as I know, you can't buy an existing ASN for any amount of money.
>>> You can buy the company that owns it, but that seems like boiling tea with
>>> a blowtorch.
>>>
>>> I sincerely doubt there are unused low-number ASNs, but you could always
>>> ask ARIN.
>>>
>>> I'm curious what your client's rationale is for wanting a low ASN.
>>>
>> It is called ASN-envy.
>>
>
> And here smaller is better :)
>
> How would one go about cleaning up the provenance and either re-using or
> selling an ASN, supposing:
>
> 1) you are all the registered contacts for the ASN and your ARIN POC is
> still valid
>
> 2) the ASN was owned by (ok...it's ARIN[1], so "registered to") a defunct
> corporation (inactive >10 years) of which you were part-owner
>
> 3) the ARIN maintenance fees have been unpaid >10 years...yet the ASN
> still exists in whois
>
> [1] It was actually assigned pre-ARIN, but to an org that eventually
> signed the RSA...so I wonder...are the maintenance fees really past
> due...and is this why the ASN was never reclaimed while the IP space (which
> was allocated by ARIN) was?
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>  Jon Lewis, MCP :)           |  I route
>                              |  therefore you are
> _________ http://www.lewis.org/~jlewis/pgp for PGP public key_________
>


More information about the NANOG mailing list