Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

Joe Hamelin joe at nethead.com
Fri Jun 2 02:17:37 UTC 2017


Sean said: "Unlike cable landing stations and satellite earth stations,
which are documented in public FCC licenses, usually to 6 decimal points of
longitude & latitude; and and included in navigation maps...."

Or you just follow the manhole covers that say Global Crossings.

--
Joe Hamelin, W7COM, Tulalip, WA, +1 (360) 474-7474

On Thu, Jun 1, 2017 at 1:57 PM, Sean Donelan <sean at donelan.com> wrote:

> On Thu, 1 Jun 2017, Rod Beck wrote:
>
>> And even in Kansas most fiber optic cables are probably next to roads, gas
>> pipelines, and railways. Pretty easy to find.
>>
>
> Unlike cable landing stations and satellite earth stations, which are
> documented in public FCC licenses, usually to 6 decimal points of longitude
> & latitude; and and included in navigation maps....
>
> Finding the exact cable routes in the middle of the country requires on
> the ground surveying and locating cable markers. Piecemeal maps exist at
> the local level, and high-level maps are available from various providers.
> But as anyone familar with cable accidents or network planning knows, those
> marketing maps are aspirational.  I had real estate people try to convince
> me that "fiber was available" at specific sites because there was a
> railroad across the road, and everyone "knew" that fiber was always next to
> railroads.
>
> Yes, its fairly simple to find a cable marker, if you put people (i.e.
> diplomats) on the ground in remote areas across the country.
>
> But, its odd to send diplomats to remote areas of the country, if you are
> not trying to survey geographic infrastructure in the middle of the country.
>


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