Why do some providers require IPv6 /64 PA space to have public whois?

Ian Smith I.Smith at F5.com
Mon Dec 10 22:53:42 UTC 2012


>Quite the opposite in fact. In IPv6 a /64 is roughly equivalent to a /32 in IPv4. As in, it's the smallest possible assignment that will allow an end-user host to >function under normal circumstances.

>SWIP or rwhois for a /64 seems excessive to me, FWIW.

IPv4/32 is both a routing endpoint and a host.  IPv4 is a 32 bit combined routing and host space.

IPv6/64 is a routing endpoint and v6/128 is a host.   IPv6 is a 64 bit routing space and also a 64 bit host space for each routing space, not a 128 bit combined routing and host space.

Evidently, the whois requirement is for networks, not nodes, which makes sense when you think about how the entity that controls a /64 is assuming responsibility for 2^64 network nodes.



-----Original Message-----
From: Doug Barton [mailto:dougb at dougbarton.us] 
Sent: Monday, December 10, 2012 5:05 PM
To: Schiller, Heather A
Cc: Constantine A. Murenin; nanog at nanog.org
Subject: Re: Why do some providers require IPv6 /64 PA space to have public whois?

On 12/10/2012 01:27 PM, Schiller, Heather A wrote:
> I think most folks would agree that, IPv4 /32 :: IPv6 /128 as IPv4 /29 
> :: IPv6 /64


Doug


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