<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; line-break: after-white-space;" class="">On 20 Mar 2022, at 5:09 AM, Masataka Ohta <<a href="mailto:mohta@necom830.hpcl.titech.ac.jp" class="">mohta@necom830.hpcl.titech.ac.jp</a>> wrote:<br class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><br class=""><div class=""><div class="">However, as William Allen Simpson wrote:<br class=""><br class=""><blockquote type="cite" class="">Then, the powers that be declared that IPv6 should have 128-bit<br class="">addresses, and a host of committees were setup with competing CLNP<br class="">(TUBA) co-chairs. They incorporated many ideas of CLNP and XNS that<br class="">were thought (by many of us) to be worthless, useless, and harmful.<br class="">Committee-itis at its worst.<br class=""></blockquote><br class="">IAB hideously striked back to make IPv6 something a lot worse than<br class="">CLNP and XNS.</div></div></blockquote></div><div><br class=""></div><div>Alas, the above characterization doesn’t even come close to the actual history of IPng – </div><div><br class=""></div><div> - There was an open call for proposals. </div><div> - We had many submissions: Nimrod, PIP, SIP, TUBA, IPAE, CATNIP (TP/IX), ...</div><div> - SIP absorbed IPAE, and then PIP merged with SIP to form SIPP</div><div> - Three final proposals CATNIP, TUBA, SIPP</div><div> - Chicago Big-10 workshop did final review and recommended SIPP, only using 128-bit “NSAP-like” addresses </div><div><br class=""></div><div>This is all quite well covered by the IPv6 recommendation document - <a href="https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/html/rfc1752" class="">https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/html/rfc1752</a></div><div>(a document which probably should be required reading for those characterizing the history of IPv6) </div><div><br class=""></div><div>FYI,</div><div>/John</div><div><br class=""></div><div><br class=""></div></body></html>