<html xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns:m="http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/2004/12/omml" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=Windows-1252">
<meta name="Generator" content="Microsoft Word 15 (filtered medium)">
<style><!--
/* Font Definitions */
@font-face
        {font-family:"Cambria Math";
        panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;}
@font-face
        {font-family:Calibri;
        panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}
/* Style Definitions */
p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0in;
        font-size:11.0pt;
        font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif;}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:blue;
        text-decoration:underline;}
.MsoChpDefault
        {mso-style-type:export-only;}
@page WordSection1
        {size:8.5in 11.0in;
        margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}
div.WordSection1
        {page:WordSection1;}
--></style>
</head>
<body lang="EN-US" link="blue" vlink="#954F72" style="word-wrap:break-word">
<div class="WordSection1">
<p class="MsoNormal">I think youíre coming at it the wrong way. Itís not going to be one, or a couple of dudes behind a screen like in the movies. Itís ran autonomously for as long as possible. Gathering information on easily accessible devices and the like.
 Any information gathered is information that can be sold, or used otherwise depending on what theyíre grabbing.</p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><o:p> </o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">-- Ryland<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><o:p> </o:p></p>
<div style="mso-element:para-border-div;border:none;border-top:solid #E1E1E1 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 0in 0in 0in">
<p class="MsoNormal" style="border:none;padding:0in"><b>From: </b><a href="mailto:pfry@tailbone.net">Peter E.Fry</a><br>
<b>Sent: </b>Monday, December 14, 2020 8:55 AM<br>
<b>To: </b><a href="mailto:nanog@nanog.org">nanog@nanog.org</a><br>
<b>Subject: </b>"Hacking" these days - purpose?</p>
</div>
<p class="MsoNormal"><o:p> </o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt"><br>
Simple question: What's the purpose of obtaining illicit access to <br>
random devices on the Internet these days, considering that a large <br>
majority of attacks are now launched from cheap, readily available and <br>
poorly managed/overseen "cloud" services?  Finding anything worthwhile <br>
to steal on random machines on the Internet seems unlikely, as does <br>
obtaining access superior (in e.g. location, bandwidth, anonymity, <br>
etc.) to the service from which the attack was launched.<br>
<br>
<br>
I was thinking about this the other day as I was poking at my <br>
firewall, and hopped onto the archives (here and elsewhere) to see if <br>
I could find any discussion.  I found a few mentions (e.g. "Microsoft <br>
is hacking my Asterisk???"), but I didn't catch any mention of <br>
purpose.  Am I missing something obvious (either a purpose or a <br>
discussion of such)?  Have I lost my mind entirely?  (Can't hurt to <br>
check, as I'd likely be the last to know.)<br>
<br>
<br>
Peter E. Fry<br>
<br>
<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><o:p> </o:p></p>
</div>
</body>
</html>