<html>
  <head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
  </head>
  <body>
    <br>
    <br>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 20/Jun/20 11:27, Baldur Norddahl
      wrote:<br>
      <br>
    </div>
    <blockquote type="cite"
cite="mid:CAPkb-7BhRqPkSXA7R_ojY5KADn--o=TO59-31-RniEy9kBKyJw@mail.gmail.com">
      <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
      <div dir="ltr">
        <div class="gmail_quote">
          <blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px
            0.8ex;border-left:1px solid
            rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
            <br>
          </blockquote>
          <div><br>
          </div>
          <div>We run the Internet in a VRF to get watertight
            separation¬†between management and the Internet. I do also
            have a CGN vrf but that one has very few routes in it (99%
            being subscriber management created, eg. one route per
            customer). Why would this create a scaling issue? If you
            collapse our three routing tables into one, you would have
            exactly the same number of routes. All we did was separate
            the routes into namespaces, to establish a firewall that
            prevents traffic to flow where it shouldn't.</div>
        </div>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    It may be less of an issue in 2020 with the current control planes
    and how far the code has come, but in the early days of l3vpn's, the
    number of VRF's you could have was directly proportional to the
    number of routes you had in each one. More VRF's, less routes for
    each. More routes per VRF, less VRF's in total.<br>
    <br>
    I don't know if that's still an issue today, as we don't run the
    Internet in a VRF. I'd defer to those with that experience, who knew
    about the scaling limitations of the past.<br>
    <br>
    Mark.<br>
  </body>
</html>