V6 still not supported

Owen DeLong owen at delong.com
Thu Mar 24 06:37:14 UTC 2022


> On Mar 23, 2022, at 11:53 , Joe Maimon <jmaimon at jmaimon.com> wrote:
> 
> 
> 
> Michael Thomas wrote:
>> 
>>> 
>> SIP won't displace all legacy PSTN any time soon. So it's a failure by your definition. And by your definition IPv6 was a failure before it was even born because the internet became popular -- something I'll add that nobody knew for certain when it was being designed. There's a lot of sour grapes about stuff that happened 30 years ago.
>> 
>> Mike
>> 
>> 
> The definition of failure flows from the definition of the objective, the goal, the desired outcome.
> 
> What is your understanding of those for IPv6?
> 
> My understanding of the goal of IPv6 was to replace IPv4 globally before address shortage caused real problems. If we agree on that, we must also agree that it has failed to do so, ergo, IPv6 as a global solution to IPv4 address shortage has been and thus far continues to be a failure. Now it will almost certainly eventually succeed, but that doesnt change that for all this time, it failed and there were real consequences that or may not carry on with us all for quite some time, and that there were real costs involved to real people.
> 
> Joe

The goal of IPv6, IMHO, is to become the next lingua franca of the internet, eventually rendering IPv4 unnecessary except in small pockets of legacy support.

I agree that has not yet been achieved.

It was an objective to try and reach that point prior to IPv4 address shortages caused real problems, but we pretty well missed that target when NAT started catching on.

I would not say that IPv6 has ben and continues to be a failure so much as IPv6 has not yet achieved its goal. Yes, it failed the (optimistic) objective of achieving it’s goal prior to IPv4 shortages causing real problems, but that happened pretty quickly and pretty early in the lifespan of IPv6 thus far (I view the popularization of NAT as being the first marker of real problems in IPv4 due to address shortage). Getting IPv6 to near ubiquitous deployment in that short time would have been an impressive accomplishment if it had happened.

Owen



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