Brocade SLX Internet Edge

Saku Ytti saku at ytti.fi
Thu Nov 1 14:31:32 UTC 2018


Hey,

They all do in principle the same thing. There are memories for
longest path lookup and memories for exact lookup. I believe the trick
is to put specific prefix size, like /24 to exact lookup table,
relieving the LPM table stress greatly. Then in parallel ask both, and
take more specific result.

There are variation to this, like having multiple separate exact match
tables, and populating each with different prefix size, and so forth.

Juniper on PTX is doing something quite different, they are asking
on-chip bloom filter about hint on where to query, reducing query
count they need to do towards high latency off-chip memory.

MX is doing yet something different, having JNPR proprietary memory
ASIC (no longer plain (RL)DRAM).

ASR9k is still just TCAM (for all ezchip generations, unsure about lightspeed).
On Thu, 1 Nov 2018 at 15:26, Colton Conor <colton.conor at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> I think Extreme is doing the same thing with their Extreme OptiScale™ that Arista is doing with their Arista FlexRoute™ and EOS NetDB™. They are both using Broadcom Jericho /Qurman with extenal TCAM, but still has a hardware limitiation on route table size. Then in software they filer right?
>
> Question is who has a better solution Arista or Extreme for this?
>
> Also, the question is can any whitebox vendors do the same thing, with the same Broadcom switch you can buy for around $9k new.
>
> Another question, could you even consider these with the Juniper MX204 coming in at $20k?
>
>
>
> On Thu, Nov 1, 2018 at 8:04 AM Kevin Burke <kburke at burlingtontelecom.com> wrote:
>>
>> Thanks for everyone who responded on and off list.
>>
>>
>>
>> As a small company that is happy to still be in business the pricing is too good to ignore.  A “gently used” ASR-9006 is something like $45k for one plus a shelf spare.  A brand new SLX 9540 is something like $30k for one plus a shelf spare.
>>
>>
>>
>> There were some common things.  Software is behind where we would like.  The occasional bug like that SSH one.  Also there are some relatively common features like IPv6 outbound ACL and BGP MED that aren’t there.  This stuff isn't a showstopper but I will take this a sign of things to come.
>>
>>
>>
>> As for the notes about full tables.  Different vendors seem to have used different techniques to get past the hard FIB limit that we are all used to.  I had the same question when pawing through the spec sheets.  So I asked the sales rep:
>>
>>
>>
>> “We can support 1.5M routes…..
>>
>>
>>
>> These platforms support all of the requirements detailed above for Internet routing. In particular, they support a table size of 1.5 million IP routes today, ensuring headroom for the next 5-7 years. This scale is made possible through our new technology called Extreme OptiScale™ for Internet Routing that optimizes programmable hardware and software capabilities to accelerate innovation and deliver investment protection.
>>
>>
>>
>> https://www.extremenetworks.com/extreme-networks-blog/internet-routing-in-the-enterprise/”
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Kevin Burke
>>
>> 802-540-0979
>>
>> Burlington Telecom - City of Burlington
>>
>> 200 Church St, Burlington, VT 05401
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: NANOG <nanog-bounces at nanog.org> On Behalf Of Kevin Burke
>> Sent: Wednesday, October 31, 2018 4:02 PM
>> To: nanog at nanog.org
>> Subject: Brocade SLX Internet Edge
>>
>>
>>
>> Does anyone have any success with the Brocade SLX 9540 or similar?  Its going to be taking full BGP tables from two Tier1's and some peering.
>>
>>
>>
>> The specs and sales rep says its fine, but the price makes me think its too good to be true.
>>
>>
>>
>> We are trying to shepherd an old Cat 6509 out of our core.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Kevin Burke
>>
>> 802-540-0979
>>
>> Burlington Telecom - City of Burlington
>>
>> 200 Church St, Burlington, VT 05401



-- 
  ++ytti



More information about the NANOG mailing list