Calgary <-> Toronto 100% Canadian Fibre Resiliency on failover

Alyssa Moore alyssa at alyssamoore.ca
Mon Oct 16 20:05:22 CST 2017


Regarding TransCanada:

I recently read they are only just beginning to experiment with fibre optic
monitoring systems for leak detection on short stretches of feeder pipeline
in Alberta. The original plans for the RoW on the Northern Courier project
(set to finish construction this year) included provisions for a
communications conduit, but that was later scrapped.

Leak detection:
https://www.transcanada.com/en/stories-container/environmentsafety/new-rd-collaboration-adds-another-layer-to-leak-detection/

I doubt there's anything pipeline-related that spans the geography in
question.


On Fri, Oct 13, 2017 at 6:03 AM <nanog-request at nanog.org> wrote:

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> Today's Topics:
>
>    1. Seznam serveru (Lumir Srchlm)
>    2. Re: Temp at Level 3 data centers (Marshall, Quincy)
>    3. Re: Temp at Level 3 data centers (Matthew Pounsett)
>    4. TSYS Contact (Dan White)
>    5. RE: Calgary <-> Toronto 100% Canadian Fibre Resiliency on
>       failover (Jacques Latour)
>    6. Re: 4 or smaller digit ASNs (Hank Nussbacher)
>    7. Re: 4 or smaller digit ASNs (John Levine)
>    8. RE: 4 or smaller digit ASNs (Naslund, Steve)
>    9. Re: Temp at Level 3 data centers (Sam Silvester)
>   10. Re: 4 or smaller digit ASNs (Steve Jones)
>   11. Re: replacing compromised biometric authenticators (Rich Kulawiec)
>   12. Re: 4 or smaller digit ASNs (valdis.kletnieks at vt.edu)
>   13. Re: replacing compromised biometric authenticators
>       (Jean-Francois Mezei)
>   14. Re: 4 or smaller digit ASNs (Jon Lewis)
>   15. Re: Temp at Level 3 data centers (William Herrin)
>   16. Re: 4 or smaller digit ASNs (Richard Hicks)
>   17. Re: Temp at Level 3 data centers (Keith Stokes)
>   18. Re: Temp at Level 3 data centers (Jean-Francois Mezei)
>   19. Google Voice Security (J. Oquendo)
>   20. Re: 4 or smaller digit ASNs (Brett Watson)
>   21. Re: replacing compromised biometric authenticators (Alain Hebert)
>   22. Re: 4 or smaller digit ASNs (Lee Howard)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 15:02:11 +0200
> From: "Lumir Srchlm" <srchlm at its.cz>
> To: " Lukáš Racek (lukas.racek at pentahospitals.cz
>         =?ISO-8859-2?B?KQ==?=" <lukas.racek at pentahospitals.cz>,
>         "=?ISO-8859-2?B?TWlyb3NsYXYgSHJpdvLhayAoZXh0ZXJuYWwp?="
>         <hrivnak at nemosnet.cz>,  "i mawsog via NANOG" <nanog at nanog.org>
> Cc: "Tomas Blinka" <blinka at its.cz>
> Subject: Seznam serveru
> Message-ID:
>         <
> OF16ECBD77.EEE27B0E-ONC12581B7.00477A64-C12581B7.00479CD4 at post.its.cz>
>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
>
> Dobry den,
>
> zasilam slibeny seznam serveru.
>
> DC1
>
> PHCZ_MIS
> PHCZ_WSUS
> PHCZ_RON
> DC01_NV
> PHCZ_ADFS01
> nv-vrc-fug-v-02
> pha-nav-v-003
> PHCZ_DC01
> DC01_NOS
> PHCZ_DADFS01
> PHCZ_TERMGW
> HART_NV
> DC01_NSO
> PHCZ_TERM1
> DC01_NSU
> PHCZ_ESET
>
>
> DC2
> PHCZ_DADFS02
> PHCZ_DC02
> PHCZ_ADFS02
>
> S pozdravem
> Lumir Srch
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 13:27:38 +0000
> From: "Marshall, Quincy" <Quincy.Marshall at reged.com>
> To: "nanog at nanog.org" <nanog at nanog.org>
> Subject: Re: Temp at Level 3 data centers
> Message-ID:
>         <
> 3438B611A2B2C04495EF0E1B25729C46BCD6EB at mbx032-e1-va-8.exch032.serverpod.net
> >
>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>
> I have equipment in several L(3) DCs. I'd say that is generally the
> exception however I have two notable facilities (smaller type 3) that have
> troubles on occasion... reaching into the 80s as you commented. (Usually
> during  the warm southern summer days) .
>
> I found that my getting to know the facility manager/personnel very
> useful. They gave staight up answers and have done what they could to
> assist.
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Chuck Anderson <cra at WPI.EDU>
> Date: 10/11/17 22:13 (GMT-05:00)
> To: nanog at nanog.org
> Subject: Re: Temp at Level 3 data centers
>
> Install an air conditioner in your rack.
>
> On Wed, Oct 11, 2017 at 02:39:19PM -0500, Andrew Latham wrote:
> > David
> >
> > The issue has several components and is vendor agnostic.
> >
> > Set Point: The systems are specifically set at a temperature
> > Capacity Ability: The systems can maintain a temperature
> > Customer Desire: What you expect from sales promises.
> > Sales Promise: What they might carefully avoid promising.
> >
> > I suggest you review your SLA and discuss with legal asap. You could
> have a
> > document defining your question's answer already but it sits in a filing
> > cabinet file labeled business continuity.
> >
> > If the set point is X then they likely would answer quickly that that is
> > the case.
> > If the capacity is lacking then they would likely redirect the issue.
> > If they don't care about the customer that alone should be an indicator
> > If a promise exists in the SLA then the ball is in your court
> >
> > >From the emails I fear that we have confirmed that this is normal. So
> your
> > question "Is the temperature at Level 3 Data Centers normally in the
> 80-90F
> > range?" sounds like a Yes.
> >
> > Regardless of the situation always ask for names, titles, and ask vendors
> > to repeat critical information like the status of cooling in a building
> > designed to deal with cooling. Keep the vendors that do it well.
> >
> >
> >
> > On Wed, Oct 11, 2017 at 7:31 AM, David Hubbard <
> > dhubbard at dino.hostasaurus.com> wrote:
> >
> > > Curious if anyone on here colo’s equipment at a Level 3 facility and
> has
> > > found the temperature unacceptably warm?  I’m having that experience
> > > currently, where ambient temp is in the 80’s, but they tell me that’s
> > > perfectly fine because vented tiles have been placed in front of all
> > > equipment racks.  My equipment is alarming for high temps, so
> obviously not
> > > fine.  Trying to find my way up to whomever I can complain to that’s
> in a
> > > position to do something about it but it seems the support staff have
> been
> > > told to brush questions about temp off as much as possible.  Was
> wondering
> > > if this is a country-wide thing for them or unique to the data center I
> > > have equipment in.  I have equipment in several others from different
> > > companies and most are probably 15-20 degrees cooler.
> > >
> > > Thanks,
> > >
> > > David
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 10:04:08 -0400
> From: Matthew Pounsett <matt at conundrum.com>
> To: "nanog at nanog.org" <nanog at nanog.org>, dhubbard at dino.hostasaurus.com
> Subject: Re: Temp at Level 3 data centers
> Message-ID:
>         <CAAiTEH-dbvsy7XD5EBirwV=QYP=FqANS=
> gPxyqsFwmFmZZuv3w at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
>
> I'm a few years removed from having direct involvement in our DCs now, so I
> don't have an example on hand to look at.  Is cooling (and in-cabinet
> temperature) not a part of the SLA?  If it is, then there shouldn't be a
> question of the DC staff brushing off complaints about the
> temperature–either L3 should fix it or pay the penalties.  If it isn't,
> then I'd suggest having a look at your contract (and possibly looking a new
> DCs) at renewal time.
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 11:18:48 -0500
> From: Dan White <dwhite at olp.net>
> To: <nanog at nanog.org>
> Subject: TSYS Contact
> Message-ID: <20171012161848.xggy2ixm24b3ww7m at dan.olp.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed
>
> If there are any personnel from TSYS here, please contact me off list.
>
> --
> Dan White
> BTC Broadband
> Network Admin Lead
> Ph  918.366.0248 <(918)%20366-0248> (direct)   main: (918)366-8000
> <(918)%20366-8000>
> Fax 918.366.6610 <(918)%20366-6610>            email: dwhite at olp.net
> http://www.btcbroadband.com
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 16:46:55 +0000
> From: Jacques Latour <Jacques.Latour at cira.ca>
> To: Jean-Francois Mezei <jfmezei_nanog at vaxination.ca>,
>         "nanog at nanog.org" <nanog at nanog.org>
> Subject: RE: Calgary <-> Toronto 100% Canadian Fibre Resiliency on
>         failover
> Message-ID: <b993e2657bcf452ea6557e35d58897d6 at cira.ca>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
>
>
> > Since the Trans Canada highway in that part of Ontario is actually a 2
> lane
> > rural road, I am not sure people would have laid fibre along it knowing
> the
> > progressive work to widen it might require frequent relocation of the
> fibre.
>
> That's a good point,  what about along the Trans-Canadian pipeline?
> https://www.transcanada.com/en/operations/maps/  Anyone know if there's
> fibre there?
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 20:39:41 +0300
> From: Hank Nussbacher <hank at efes.iucc.ac.il>
> To: nanog at nanog.org
> Subject: Re: 4 or smaller digit ASNs
> Message-ID: <cfd4c969-b6f1-5a23-267f-ae820ef3e03c at efes.iucc.ac.il>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
>
> On 12/10/2017 08:47, Mel Beckman wrote:
> > James,
> >
> > As far as I know, you can't buy an existing ASN for any amount of money.
> You can buy the company that owns it, but that seems like boiling tea with
> a blowtorch.
> >
> > I sincerely doubt there are unused low-number ASNs, but you could always
> ask ARIN.
> >
> > I'm curious what your client's rationale is for wanting a low ASN.
> It is called ASN-envy.
>
> -Hank
> AS378 :-)
>
>
> >  It can't be efficiency, since the numbers all take the same number of
> bits ultimately. If they just like small numbers, I'd advise them to forget
> it -- life is too short. If they have a real technical reason that nobody
> has foreseen (or at least I haven't foreseen), I'd love to hear it.
> >
> >
> >  -mel beckman
> >
> >> On Oct 11, 2017, at 10:01 PM, James Breeden <James at arenalgroup.co>
> wrote:
> >>
> >> Hello NANOG...
> >>
> >> I have a client interested in picking up a new AS number but they
> really want it to be 3 or 4 digits in length.
> >>
> >> Is there a process to request this from ARIN, or doss anyone know of
> unused ASns fitting this that anyone is looking to sell for some quick cash?
> >>
> >> Thanks!
> >> James
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S7 active, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 7
> Date: 12 Oct 2017 20:28:49 -0000
> From: "John Levine" <johnl at iecc.com>
> To: nanog at nanog.org
> Subject: Re: 4 or smaller digit ASNs
> Message-ID: <20171012202849.43329.qmail at ary.lan>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
>
> In article <20171012070551.GA52873 at spider.typo.org> you write:
> >> > I'm curious what your client's rationale is for wanting a low ASN.
> >
> >Dare I say it?
> >
> >Nerds often get overly excited at things that are generally pretty
> >small...
>
> Too bad I can't sell my old NSI handle.
>
> R's,
> JL7
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 8
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 20:40:42 +0000
> From: "Naslund, Steve" <SNaslund at medline.com>
> To: "nanog at nanog.org" <nanog at nanog.org>
> Subject: RE: 4 or smaller digit ASNs
> Message-ID:
>         <
> 9578293AE169674F9A048B2BC9A081B40262159F01 at MUNPRDMBXA1.medline.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> I've got a DDN TAC access card if they are interested in that as well.
> Might even be able to dig up a BBN PAD for them too.
>
> Steven Naslund
> Chicago IL
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: NANOG [mailto:nanog-bounces at nanog.org] On Behalf Of John Levine
> Sent: Thursday, October 12, 2017 3:29 PM
> To: nanog at nanog.org
> Subject: Re: 4 or smaller digit ASNs
>
> In article <20171012070551.GA52873 at spider.typo.org> you write:
> >> > I'm curious what your client's rationale is for wanting a low ASN.
> >
> >Dare I say it?
> >
> >Nerds often get overly excited at things that are generally pretty
> >small...
>
> Too bad I can't sell my old NSI handle.
>
> R's,
> JL7
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 9
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 10:22:31 +1030
> From: Sam Silvester <sam.silvester at gmail.com>
> To: "nanog at nanog.org" <nanog at nanog.org>
> Subject: Re: Temp at Level 3 data centers
> Message-ID:
>         <CAAAhk69MfV7c+ZVzftiH-yeqOL4V5=kWJ-j=
> YNRvBeZdUAwkAA at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
>
> On Thu, Oct 12, 2017 at 3:39 AM, Naslund, Steve <SNaslund at medline.com>
> wrote:
>
> > If the ambient temperature is higher is means the temperatures throughout
> > the device would be higher and the temp at those points is what really
> > matters.  I would also be concerned because if they lose one of the a/c
> > units what would the ambient temperature rise to?  I would want them to
> > tell me what the set point of the a/c actually is.
> >
> > Bottom line 80 F input air is too hot in my opinion and apparently the
> > equipment's opinion as well.
> >
>
> My quick thoughts on the matter:
>
> 1. Above all else, know what your DC provider states in their SLA/contract.
> 2. It's never a bad idea to try to be on the best possible personal terms
> with the DC manager(s), the better you get along the more they're inclined
> to share knowledge/issues and work with you on any concerns.
> 3. You can't infer faults or lack of redundancy from the running
> temperature - by way of example several facilities I know run at 25 degrees
> celsius but if a chilled water unit in a given data hall fails there's a
> number of DX units held in standby to take over. This is where point 2
> comes in handy as knowing somebody on the ground they'll often be quite
> happy to run through failure scenarios with you and help make sure
> everybody is happy with the risk mitigation strategy.
>
> Out of idle curiosity - I'm curious as to if the equipment that is alarming
> is configurable or not? Reason I ask is I've heard users claiming
> environmental parameters were out of spec before, but then it turned out it
> was their own environmental monitoring they'd installed in the rack (using
> default parameters out of the box, not configured to match the facility
> SLA) that was complaining about a set point of 25...
>
> Cheers,
>
> Sam
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 10
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 00:55:35 -0500
> From: Steve Jones <thatoneguysteve at gmail.com>
> To: Mel Beckman <mel at beckman.org>
> Cc: James Breeden <James at arenalgroup.co>, "nanog at nanog.org"
>         <nanog at nanog.org>
> Subject: Re: 4 or smaller digit ASNs
> Message-ID:
>         <CAGOa4nOgoZ1huFcQFHUKi_TpPgaEiuR2L=
> hFy5_qn84QunoAkw at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
>
> as i understand it, you cant do bgp at all under 5
>
> On Thu, Oct 12, 2017 at 12:47 AM, Mel Beckman <mel at beckman.org> wrote:
>
> > James,
> >
> > As far as I know, you can't buy an existing ASN for any amount of money.
> > You can buy the company that owns it, but that seems like boiling tea
> with
> > a blowtorch.
> >
> > I sincerely doubt there are unused low-number ASNs, but you could always
> > ask ARIN.
> >
> > I'm curious what your client's rationale is for wanting a low ASN. It
> > can't be efficiency, since the numbers all take the same number of bits
> > ultimately. If they just like small numbers, I'd advise them to forget it
> > -- life is too short. If they have a real technical reason that nobody
> has
> > foreseen (or at least I haven't foreseen), I'd love to hear it.
> >
> >
> >  -mel beckman
> >
> > > On Oct 11, 2017, at 10:01 PM, James Breeden <James at arenalgroup.co>
> > wrote:
> > >
> > > Hello NANOG...
> > >
> > > I have a client interested in picking up a new AS number but they
> really
> > want it to be 3 or 4 digits in length.
> > >
> > > Is there a process to request this from ARIN, or doss anyone know of
> > unused ASns fitting this that anyone is looking to sell for some quick
> cash?
> > >
> > > Thanks!
> > > James
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S7 active, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
> >
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 11
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 16:58:35 -0400
> From: Rich Kulawiec <rsk at gsp.org>
> To: nanog at nanog.org
> Subject: Re: replacing compromised biometric authenticators
> Message-ID: <20171012205835.GA5109 at gsp.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> On Wed, Oct 11, 2017 at 05:04:08PM -0400, Ken Chase wrote:
> > If the current best operating practice is to avoid biometrics, why are
> they
> > still in use out here?
>
> (1) for the same reason some idiots still use captchas
> (2) new hotness > old and busted, regardless of merits
> (3) because they facilitate coerced risk transference away from the
> people who are actually responsible (and are paid to be so) to the
> people who shouldn't be responsible (and aren't paid to be)
>
> ---rsk
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 12
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 16:58:52 -0400
> From: valdis.kletnieks at vt.edu
> To: Steve Jones <thatoneguysteve at gmail.com>
> Cc: Mel Beckman <mel at beckman.org>, "nanog at nanog.org" <nanog at nanog.org>
> Subject: Re: 4 or smaller digit ASNs
> Message-ID: <21717.1507841932 at turing-police.cc.vt.edu>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> On Thu, 12 Oct 2017 00:55:35 -0500, Steve Jones said:
> > as i understand it, you cant do bgp at all under 5
>
> AS1312 does BGP quite nicely... Not sure what you meant there, unless the
> text/plain lost the <font=sarcasm> tags...
>
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 13
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 17:53:16 -0400
> From: Jean-Francois Mezei <jfmezei_nanog at vaxination.ca>
> To: nanog at nanog.org
> Subject: Re: replacing compromised biometric authenticators
> Message-ID: <183bbe65-4d86-d26f-fdd1-66922d418928 at vaxination.ca>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
>
> On 2017-10-12 16:58, Rich Kulawiec wrote:
>
> > (3) because they facilitate coerced risk transference away from the
> > people who are actually responsible (and are paid to be so) to the
> > people who shouldn't be responsible (and aren't paid to be)
>
>
> I think biometrics are seen as a means to reduce the possible
> errors/corruption of a security guard by shifting responsibility to a
> computer.
>
> When you have multiple tennants, the DC can't assume all tennants will
> keep all access cards secure so has to protect tennant 2 from tennant 1
> having cards stolen by some crook intent on damaging tennant 2's cards.
>
> A security guard matching face to picture on card AND picture in his
> computer for that card can be very good, and woudl eliminate card
> counterfeiting (with match against the DC's database of images) but
> would not eliminate security guard making mistakes and allowing people
> whose face does not match (corruption or lazyness).
>
>
> This is very different from a data centre owned by a single tennant who
> has full control over staff and knows who is and isn't staff and
> authorized to go in.
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 14
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 18:13:32 -0400 (EDT)
> From: Jon Lewis <jlewis at lewis.org>
> To: Hank Nussbacher <hank at efes.iucc.ac.il>
> Cc: nanog at nanog.org
> Subject: Re: 4 or smaller digit ASNs
> Message-ID: <alpine.LRH.2.02.1710121420210.6210 at soloth.lewis.org>
> Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; format=flowed; charset=US-ASCII
>
> On Thu, 12 Oct 2017, Hank Nussbacher wrote:
>
> > On 12/10/2017 08:47, Mel Beckman wrote:
> >> James,
> >>
> >> As far as I know, you can't buy an existing ASN for any amount of
> money. You can buy the company that owns it, but that seems like boiling
> tea with a blowtorch.
> >>
> >> I sincerely doubt there are unused low-number ASNs, but you could
> always ask ARIN.
> >>
> >> I'm curious what your client's rationale is for wanting a low ASN.
> > It is called ASN-envy.
>
> And here smaller is better :)
>
> How would one go about cleaning up the provenance and either re-using or
> selling an ASN, supposing:
>
> 1) you are all the registered contacts for the ASN and your ARIN POC is
> still valid
>
> 2) the ASN was owned by (ok...it's ARIN[1], so "registered to") a defunct
> corporation (inactive >10 years) of which you were part-owner
>
> 3) the ARIN maintenance fees have been unpaid >10 years...yet the ASN
> still exists in whois
>
> [1] It was actually assigned pre-ARIN, but to an org that eventually
> signed the RSA...so I wonder...are the maintenance fees really past
> due...and is this why the ASN was never reclaimed while the IP space
> (which was allocated by ARIN) was?
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>   Jon Lewis, MCP :)           |  I route
>                               |  therefore you are
> _________ http://www.lewis.org/~jlewis/pgp for PGP public key_________
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 15
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 18:43:55 -0400
> From: William Herrin <bill at herrin.us>
> To: David Hubbard <dhubbard at dino.hostasaurus.com>
> Cc: "nanog at nanog.org" <nanog at nanog.org>
> Subject: Re: Temp at Level 3 data centers
> Message-ID:
>         <CAP-guGW4WyGr-edvuOMP=
> e71PzmpRjd5xR3U-_KneHZ_vrU5Aw at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
>
> On Wed, Oct 11, 2017 at 8:31 AM, David Hubbard <
> dhubbard at dino.hostasaurus.com> wrote:
>
> > Curious if anyone on here colo’s equipment at a Level 3 facility and has
> > found the temperature unacceptably warm?  I’m having that experience
> > currently, where ambient temp is in the 80’s, but they tell me that’s
> > perfectly fine because vented tiles have been placed in front of all
> > equipment racks.
>
>
> Hi David,
>
> The thing I'm not understanding in this thread is that the last time I
> checked Level 3 was a premium player not a cost player. Has that changed?
>
> If a premium data center vendor is asking you to swallow 80F in the cold
> aisle, something is very wrong. But realize I just said 80F in the *cold
> aisle*. DC cooling is not about "ambient" or "sensible cooling" or similar
> terms bandied about by ordinary HVAC professionals. In a data center, air
> doesn't really stack up anywhere. It flows.
>
> If you haven't physically checked your racks, it's time to do that. There
> are lots of reasons for high temps in the cabinet which aren't the DC's
> fault.
>
> Is all the air flow in your cabinet correctly moving from the cold aisle to
> the hot aisle? Even those side-venting Cisco switches? You're sure? If
> you're looping air inside the cabinet, that's your fault.
>
> Have you or your rack neighbors exceeded the heat density that the DC's
> HVAC system supports? If you have, the air in the hot aisle may be looping
> over the top of the cabinets and back in to your servers. You can't
> necessarily fill a cabinet with equipment. When you reach the allowable
> heat density, you have to start filling the next cabinet. I've seen DC
> cabinets left half empty for exactly this reason.
>
> Regards,
> Bill Herrin
>
>
> --
> William Herrin ................ herrin at dirtside.com  bill at herrin.us
> Dirtside Systems ......... Web: <http://www.dirtside.com/>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 16
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 15:53:07 -0700
> From: Richard Hicks <richard.hicks at gmail.com>
> To: "nanog at nanog.org" <nanog at nanog.org>
> Subject: Re: 4 or smaller digit ASNs
> Message-ID:
>         <CA+uSw_WzR_WF3h_MzkVZ5ZUGR=
> Wa_V74ZFUx1enoccYJqgTKRQ at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
>
> Anyone know the history behind ASN 2906 (Netflix)?
> How did they get a number that low?
>
> Rick
>
> On Thu, Oct 12, 2017 at 3:13 PM, Jon Lewis <jlewis at lewis.org> wrote:
>
> > On Thu, 12 Oct 2017, Hank Nussbacher wrote:
> >
> > On 12/10/2017 08:47, Mel Beckman wrote:
> >>
> >>> James,
> >>>
> >>> As far as I know, you can't buy an existing ASN for any amount of
> money.
> >>> You can buy the company that owns it, but that seems like boiling tea
> with
> >>> a blowtorch.
> >>>
> >>> I sincerely doubt there are unused low-number ASNs, but you could
> always
> >>> ask ARIN.
> >>>
> >>> I'm curious what your client's rationale is for wanting a low ASN.
> >>>
> >> It is called ASN-envy.
> >>
> >
> > And here smaller is better :)
> >
> > How would one go about cleaning up the provenance and either re-using or
> > selling an ASN, supposing:
> >
> > 1) you are all the registered contacts for the ASN and your ARIN POC is
> > still valid
> >
> > 2) the ASN was owned by (ok...it's ARIN[1], so "registered to") a defunct
> > corporation (inactive >10 years) of which you were part-owner
> >
> > 3) the ARIN maintenance fees have been unpaid >10 years...yet the ASN
> > still exists in whois
> >
> > [1] It was actually assigned pre-ARIN, but to an org that eventually
> > signed the RSA...so I wonder...are the maintenance fees really past
> > due...and is this why the ASN was never reclaimed while the IP space
> (which
> > was allocated by ARIN) was?
> >
> > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >  Jon Lewis, MCP :)           |  I route
> >                              |  therefore you are
> > _________ http://www.lewis.org/~jlewis/pgp for PGP public key_________
> >
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 17
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 22:57:30 +0000
> From: Keith Stokes <keiths at neilltech.com>
> To: William Herrin <bill at herrin.us>
> Cc: David Hubbard <dhubbard at dino.hostasaurus.com>, "nanog at nanog.org"
>         <nanog at nanog.org>
> Subject: Re: Temp at Level 3 data centers
> Message-ID: <956175C1-7DCF-4930-B971-C3B8F1F3EBA6 at neilltech.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> If you are using hot/cold aisles and don't fill the rack, don't forget you
> have to put in blank panels.
>
> --
>
> Keith Stokes
>
> > On Oct 12, 2017, at 5:45 PM, William Herrin <bill at herrin.us> wrote:
> >
> > On Wed, Oct 11, 2017 at 8:31 AM, David Hubbard <
> > dhubbard at dino.hostasaurus.com> wrote:
> >
> >> Curious if anyone on here colo’s equipment at a Level 3 facility and has
> >> found the temperature unacceptably warm?  I’m having that experience
> >> currently, where ambient temp is in the 80’s, but they tell me that’s
> >> perfectly fine because vented tiles have been placed in front of all
> >> equipment racks.
> >
> >
> > Hi David,
> >
> > The thing I'm not understanding in this thread is that the last time I
> > checked Level 3 was a premium player not a cost player. Has that changed?
> >
> > If a premium data center vendor is asking you to swallow 80F in the cold
> > aisle, something is very wrong. But realize I just said 80F in the *cold
> > aisle*. DC cooling is not about "ambient" or "sensible cooling" or
> similar
> > terms bandied about by ordinary HVAC professionals. In a data center, air
> > doesn't really stack up anywhere. It flows.
> >
> > If you haven't physically checked your racks, it's time to do that. There
> > are lots of reasons for high temps in the cabinet which aren't the DC's
> > fault.
> >
> > Is all the air flow in your cabinet correctly moving from the cold aisle
> to
> > the hot aisle? Even those side-venting Cisco switches? You're sure? If
> > you're looping air inside the cabinet, that's your fault.
> >
> > Have you or your rack neighbors exceeded the heat density that the DC's
> > HVAC system supports? If you have, the air in the hot aisle may be
> looping
> > over the top of the cabinets and back in to your servers. You can't
> > necessarily fill a cabinet with equipment. When you reach the allowable
> > heat density, you have to start filling the next cabinet. I've seen DC
> > cabinets left half empty for exactly this reason.
> >
> > Regards,
> > Bill Herrin
> >
> >
> > --
> > William Herrin ................ herrin at dirtside.com  bill at herrin.us
> > Dirtside Systems ......... Web: <http://www.dirtside.com/>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 18
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 19:56:14 -0400
> From: Jean-Francois Mezei <jfmezei_nanog at vaxination.ca>
> To: nanog at nanog.org
> Subject: Re: Temp at Level 3 data centers
> Message-ID: <84c8cd8f-a2c2-f820-d210-114fdd5ae892 at vaxination.ca>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
>
> back in the arly 1990s, Tandem had a computer called "Cyclone". (these
> were mission critical, fault tolerant machines).
>
> The reason for "Cyclone" name was that the cabinets had huge fan
> capacity, and that was to deal with air conditioning failure by
> increasing the air flow over the electronics to still keep then "comfy"
> despite high data centre air temperature. (with the aim of having the
> Tandem continue to run despite HVAC failure).
>
> With dense  computers packed in 1U, you just can't have that excessive
> airflow to cope with HVAC failure with tiny 1" fans.
>
> The other difference is data centre density.  Bank computer rooms were
> sparse compared to today's densely packed racks. So lots of space
> relative to heat sources.
>
> The equivalent today would be the football field size data centres from
> the likes of Google with high ceilings and hot air from one area with
> failed HVAC to rise to ceiling and partly be taken out by the others.
>
> But when you are talking about downdown co-lo with enclosed suites that
> are packed to the brim, failure of HVAC results in quick temp increases
> because the heat has nowhere to spread to, and HVACs from adjoining also
> enclosed suites can't provide help.
>
> So when a tennant agrees to rent rack space in an small enclosed suite,
> it should be considerewd that the odds of failure due to heat are
> greater (and perhaps consider renting rack space in different suites to
> provide some redundancy).
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 19
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 20:31:43 -0500
> From: "J. Oquendo" <joquendo at e-fensive.net>
> To: nanog at nanog.org
> Subject: Google Voice Security
> Message-ID: <20171013013143.he5jhxzelbb57d3l at e-fensive.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
>
> Sorry for the noise. Can someone put me in touch with
> someone in the Google Voice (application iPhone/Android)
> department to discuss an issue. Greatly appreciated.
>
> --
> =+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+
> J. Oquendo
> SGFA, SGFE, C|EH, CNDA, CHFI, OSCP, CPT, RWSP, GREM
>
> "Where ignorance is our master, there is no possibility of
> real peace" - Dalai Lama
>
> 0B23 595C F07C 6092 8AEB  074B FC83 7AF5 9D8A 4463
> https://pgp.mit.edu/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0xFC837AF59D8A4463
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 20
> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 21:28:45 -0700
> From: Brett Watson <brett at the-watsons.org>
> To: nanog at nanog.org
> Subject: Re: 4 or smaller digit ASNs
> Message-ID: <501CC431-262C-453E-AB38-9BB80FDCA0A0 at the-watsons.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain;       charset=utf-8
>
>
> > On Oct 12, 2017, at 15:53, Richard Hicks <richard.hicks at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >
> > Anyone know the history behind ASN 2906 (Netflix)?
> > How did they get a number that low?
>
> I didn’t recognize as2906 so went digging... and I can’t find a thing.
> ARIN has a “who has” service but my account on ARIN was locked and I wasn’t
> able to unlock without calling them (maybe tomorrow).
>
> The AS-Name is “AS-SSI” (there is an AS-Set listed on RIPE named this)
> which I suspect might lead to the original owner. It looks familiar-ish but
> I’m not sure who had it before Netflix. Clearly they must have bought it
> outright, acquired the original owner, or something, but I’ll be damned if
> I can find historical data on who it originally belonged to.
>
> -b
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 21
> Date: Fri, 13 Oct 2017 07:03:30 -0400
> From: Alain Hebert <ahebert at pubnix.net>
> To: nanog at nanog.org
> Subject: Re: replacing compromised biometric authenticators
> Message-ID: <33e87e9c-3a7e-bd35-5c47-81cb7f3237b4 at pubnix.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed
>
>      Odd,
>
>      1. captcha(?)
>
>      In my millennia of experience I never saw a captcha used as a mean
> for DC access control.  Just as a programmatic way to reduce brute force
> for some website functions.
>
>
>      On my network janitor keychain I have (in order of hackability from
> easiest to hardest)
>
>          1. keycard only
>
>          2. keycard + fingerprints
>
>          3. keycard + face (2d)
>
>          4a. keycard + eye
>
>          4b. keycard + top of hand mapping
>
>      But all the DCs, I deal with, have highrez cameras and tailgating
> controls...  Biometrics are just a part of a wider system.
>
> -----
> Alain Hebert                                ahebert at pubnix.net
> PubNIX Inc.
> 50 boul. St-Charles
> P.O. Box 26770     Beaconsfield, Quebec     H9W 6G7
> Tel: 514-990-5911 <(514)%20990-5911>  http://www.pubnix.net    Fax:
> 514-990-9443 <(514)%20990-9443>
>
> On 10/12/17 16:58, Rich Kulawiec wrote:
> > On Wed, Oct 11, 2017 at 05:04:08PM -0400, Ken Chase wrote:
> >> If the current best operating practice is to avoid biometrics, why are
> they
> >> still in use out here?
> > (1) for the same reason some idiots still use captchas
> > (2) new hotness > old and busted, regardless of merits
> > (3) because they facilitate coerced risk transference away from the
> > people who are actually responsible (and are paid to be so) to the
> > people who shouldn't be responsible (and aren't paid to be)
> >
> > ---rsk
> >
> >
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 22
> Date: Fri, 13 Oct 2017 07:59:36 -0400
> From: Lee Howard <lee at asgard.org>
> To: James Breeden <James at arenalgroup.co>
> Cc: "nanog at nanog.org" <nanog at nanog.org>
> Subject: Re: 4 or smaller digit ASNs
> Message-ID: <2047F678-3C86-4DFC-9008-EDBD9A192718 at asgard.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain;       charset=us-ascii
>
>
>
> > On Oct 12, 2017, at 1:01 AM, James Breeden <James at arenalgroup.co> wrote:
> >
> > Hello NANOG...
> >
> > I have a client interested in picking up a new AS number but they really
> want it to be 3 or 4 digits in length.
> >
> > Is there a process to request this from ARIN, or doss anyone know of
> unused ASns fitting this that anyone is looking to sell for some quick cash?
> >
>
> It's part of the ARIN transfer process,
> https://www.arin.net/policy/nrpm.html#eight specific 8.3, "IPv4 numbers
> resources and ASNs may be transferred according to the following
> conditions."
>
> ARIN has a Specified Transfer Listing Service,
> https://www.arin.net/resources/transfer_listing/index.html so you could
> check there.
> I didn't see any ASNs listed, so you may need to call a broker, such as
> one listed under
> https://www.arin.net/resources/transfer_listing/facilitator_list.html
>
> A list of ASNs that have been transferred policy can be found at
> https://www.arin.net/public/transferLog.xhtml#NRPM-8.3ASNs
>
>
>
> > Thanks!
> > James
> >
>
> Hope that helps,
>
> Lee
>
> >
> >
> >
> > Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S7 active, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
>
>
> End of NANOG Digest, Vol 117, Issue 13
> **************************************
>


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