Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

valdis.kletnieks at vt.edu valdis.kletnieks at vt.edu
Fri Jun 2 16:46:31 UTC 2017


On Fri, 02 Jun 2017 15:11:36 -0000, Rod Beck said:

> Landing stations can be 10 to 30 kilometers from the beach manhole. I don't
> think it is big concern. Hibernia Atlantic dublin landing station is a good
> example.

So 100% of those beach manholes are watertight and safe from flooding, and
don't contain any gear that will get upset if it does in fact end up with
salt water in there?

This listing for landing points in Japan seems to call out a hell of a lot of
specific buildings that are nowhere near 10 to 30 km inland:
https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1Siy5qBMoFyBUlSFNHdHDpGAkIR0

Singapore: Right on the water.
http://www.streetdirectory.com/sg/singapore-cable-landing-station/1-changi-north-rise-498817/8118_79569.html

Hong Kong:  More of same (though with its hills, some of the 8 sites may
actually be a bit above sea level even though they're 2 blocks from water)
http://www.ofca.gov.hk/en/industry_focus/telecommunications/facility_based/infrastructures/submarine_cables/index.html

Cryptome has a bunch of older images that tend to indicate that a lot of
buildings right on the water in New Jersey and Long Island are involved:
https://cryptome.org/eyeball/cable/cable-eyeball.htm

And that's just in the first 3 pages returned by Google for "cable landing station
map".

The experience of the Manhattan phone system when the conduits and basements
flooded during Sandy tends to indicate that we *are* in for similar
surprises over the coming decades.
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