Companies using public IP space owned by others for internal routing

Owen DeLong owen at delong.com
Thu Dec 21 04:09:08 CST 2017


> On Dec 19, 2017, at 18:22 , Valdis.Kletnieks at vt.edu wrote:
> 
> On Tue, 19 Dec 2017 20:18:57 +0000, "UpTide ." said:
>> If we allocate a /64 like we do single ipv4 addresses now the space gets 2^56
>> (16777216) times larger; but if we start doing something crazy like allocating
>> a /48 or /56 that number plummets. (256 times larger, and 65536 times larger
>> respectfully.)
> 
> You seem to have missed an entire octet's worth of bits, so off by a factor of 256…
> 
That’s OK… You seem to have your directions reversed...

> A /48 is 16 more bits than a /32, so 65536 times bigger.

You mean smaller.

> A /56 is 24 more bits than a /32, so 16777216 times bigger.

You mean smaller.

> And a /64 is 32 bits more than a /32... so....
> 
> Given that a /33 is just about enough to give everybody in the planet one,
> giving away 8 million times that many is going to be a challenge, unless
> somebody invents nanotech that wants a separate address for each nanomachine.

Not outside the realm of possibility, but they’d need to invent nonotech
that resulted in 8+million * 18 quintillion machines per person to really
cause a problem.

> 
> But I'd argue that if I have personal nanotech, I *really* want to use ULA
> addresses. They're *my* nanotech. :)
> 

Feel free. Personally, I still see ULA as an absurdity.

Owen



More information about the NANOG mailing list