Free access to measurement network

Mike Hammett nanog at ics-il.net
Mon Dec 18 16:28:16 CST 2017


Anyone can roll their own wireline at the maximum regulatory effort of becoming a CLEC and construction permits. Some jurisdictions will let you in without this, but if you have the former, they must allow you the same access as the ILEC. 

Otherwise, they can do fixed wireless. 




----- 
Mike Hammett 
Intelligent Computing Solutions 

Midwest Internet Exchange 

The Brothers WISP 

----- Original Message -----

From: timrutherford at c4.net 
To: "Mike Hammett" <nanog at ics-il.net> 
Cc: nanog at nanog.org 
Sent: Monday, December 18, 2017 10:25:37 AM 
Subject: RE: Free access to measurement network 

The problem lies in the contracts that the big providers make the municipalities sign. Basically says that the incumbent cable provider cannot be ousted without breach of contract. The towns all sign because their only other choice is to roll out their own infrastructure which very few see the real value in. 

-----Original Message----- 
From: NANOG [mailto:nanog-bounces at nanog.org] On Behalf Of Mike Hammett 
Sent: Monday, December 18, 2017 11:05 AM 
Cc: nanog at nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Free access to measurement network 

BTW: There are no government-enforced monopolies anywhere in the US, aside from possibly Native American reservations. 




----- 
Mike Hammett 
Intelligent Computing Solutions 

Midwest Internet Exchange 

The Brothers WISP 

----- Original Message ----- 

From: "Edwin Pers" <EPers at ansencorp.com> 
To: "Mike Hammett" <nanog at ics-il.net> 
Cc: nanog at nanog.org 
Sent: Monday, December 18, 2017 10:03:52 AM 
Subject: RE: Free access to measurement network 

Yes, the fact that both the city I work in and the town I live in have local govt-enforced monopolies reinforces the statement that I've (and all the other people near me) been voting with our collective wallets this entire time 

-----Original Message----- 
From: NANOG [mailto:nanog-bounces at nanog.org] On Behalf Of Mike Hammett 
Sent: Saturday, December 16, 2017 10:23 AM 
Cc: nanog at nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Free access to measurement network 

It's a consumer thing. If consumers wanted more options, they would be supporting those options with their wallets. They don't. 




----- 
Mike Hammett 
Intelligent Computing Solutions 

Midwest Internet Exchange 

The Brothers WISP 

----- Original Message ----- 

From: "Max Tulyev" <maxtul at netassist.ua> 
To: nanog at nanog.org 
Sent: Saturday, December 16, 2017 4:43:54 AM 
Subject: Re: Free access to measurement network 

So for my point of view, better solution is to push some law that ease access to the buildings for ISPs. 

15.12.17 19:40, valdis.kletnieks at vt.edu пише: 
> On Fri, 15 Dec 2017 07:47:42 -0500, Dovid Bender said: 
>> What kind of internet are these devices on? With Net Neutrality gone 
>> here in the US it would be a good way to measure certain services 
>> such as SIP to see which ISP's if any are tampering with packets. 
> 
> Given previous history, the answer will probably be "most of them". 
> 
> "The results are not inspiring. More than 129 million people are 
> limited to a single provider for broadband Internet access using the 
> FCC definition of 25 Mbps download and 3 Mbps upload. Out of those 129 
> million Americans, about 52 million must obtain Internet access from a 
> company that has violated network neutrality protections in the past and continues to undermine the policy today. 
> 
> In locations where subscribers have the benefit of limited 
> competition, the situation isn't much better. Among the 146 million 
> Americans with the ability to choose between two providers, 48 million 
> Americans must choose between two companies that have a record of violating network neutrality." 
> 
> https://muninetworks.org/content/177-million-americans-harmed-net-neut 
> rality 
> 







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