Free access to measurement network

Mike Hammett nanog at ics-il.net
Sat Dec 16 20:43:09 CST 2017


That project was paid for by ARRA funds and ran out. 

The FCC picked up the ball by expanding the scope of its 477 program. That data is available directly on their site or via some sites like broadbandnow.com 

There are also many service providers available that aren't filing because either A) they don't know about it or B) government stuff. 

My point was that consumers voted out thousands of independents by taking service from incumbents instead of independents. Thousands have closed up shop. Where independents are available, it's still tough getting customers if the incumbents have a service that mostly works (over say 5 to 10 megs), even if the independent offers service comparable to the incumbent's advertisements. 




----- 
Mike Hammett 
Intelligent Computing Solutions 

Midwest Internet Exchange 

The Brothers WISP 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Lee" <ler762 at gmail.com> 
To: "Mike Hammett" <nanog at ics-il.net> 
Cc: nanog at nanog.org 
Sent: Saturday, December 16, 2017 2:16:38 PM 
Subject: Re: Free access to measurement network 

On 12/16/17, Mike Hammett <nanog at ics-il.net> wrote: 
> It's a consumer thing. If consumers wanted more options, they would be 
> supporting those options with their wallets. They don't. 

As far as I know, my options for >50Mb/s are comcast and verizon. 

https://www.broadbandmap.gov/ sez 
Please note: National Broadband Map data is from June 30, 2014 and is 
no longer being updated. 

How do I find out what my other options are? 

Thanks, 
Lee 

> 
> ----- 
> Mike Hammett 
> Intelligent Computing Solutions 
> 
> Midwest Internet Exchange 
> 
> The Brothers WISP 
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> 
> From: "Max Tulyev" <maxtul at netassist.ua> 
> To: nanog at nanog.org 
> Sent: Saturday, December 16, 2017 4:43:54 AM 
> Subject: Re: Free access to measurement network 
> 
> So for my point of view, better solution is to push some law that ease 
> access to the buildings for ISPs. 
> 
> 15.12.17 19:40, valdis.kletnieks at vt.edu пише: 
>> On Fri, 15 Dec 2017 07:47:42 -0500, Dovid Bender said: 
>>> What kind of internet are these devices on? With Net Neutrality gone here 
>>> 
>>> in the US it would be a good way to measure certain services such as SIP 
>>> to 
>>> see which ISP's if any are tampering with packets. 
>> 
>> Given previous history, the answer will probably be "most of them". 
>> 
>> "The results are not inspiring. More than 129 million people are limited 
>> to a 
>> single provider for broadband Internet access using the FCC definition of 
>> 25 
>> Mbps download and 3 Mbps upload. Out of those 129 million Americans, about 
>> 52 
>> million must obtain Internet access from a company that has violated 
>> network 
>> neutrality protections in the past and continues to undermine the policy 
>> today. 
>> 
>> In locations where subscribers have the benefit of limited competition, 
>> the 
>> situation isn't much better. Among the 146 million Americans with the 
>> ability 
>> to choose between two providers, 48 million Americans must choose between 
>> two 
>> companies that have a record of violating network neutrality." 
>> 
>> https://muninetworks.org/content/177-million-americans-harmed-net-neutrality 
>> 
>> 
> 
> 



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