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Steve Lerner steve at stevelerner.com
Wed Aug 23 12:15:04 UTC 2017


On Wed, Aug 23, 2017 at 8:00 AM, <nanog-request at nanog.org> wrote:

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> Today's Topics:
>
>    1. Re: Creating a Circuit ID Format (Tassos Chatzithomaoglou)
>    2. Re: Creating a Circuit ID Format (Jared Mauch)
>    3. 2017 NANOG Elections General Information (Dave Temkin)
>    4. Re: Creating a Circuit ID Format (Justin M. Streiner)
>    5. Re: Creating a Circuit ID Format (Nick Hilliard)
>    6. Spectrum web cache engineer (Andrew Kirch)
>    7. RE: Creating a Circuit ID Format (Timothy Creswick)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 19:01:56 +0300
> From: Tassos Chatzithomaoglou <achatz at forthnet.gr>
> To: NANOG <nanog at nanog.org>
> Subject: Re: Creating a Circuit ID Format
> Message-ID: <6b76d308-1a55-af42-c7cd-195d77147a3b at forthnet.gr>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>
> I don't know if it has any relation to your issue, but we use Circuit-ID
> to uniquely identify the access node plus the customer's access loop
> logical port on the access node.
> Access node can be either a DSLAM, a switch, an OLT, etc.
>
> You may have a look at BBF's TR-101 (section 3.9.3)  or TR-156 (section
> 5.7) for syntax guide .
>
> --
> Tassos
>
> Colton Conor wrote on 21/8/17 23:26:
> > We are building a new fiber network, and need help creating a circuit ID
> > format to for new fiber circuits. Is there a guide or standard for fiber
> > circuit formats? Does the circuit ID change when say a customer upgrades
> > for 100Mbps to 1Gbps port?
> >
> > What do the larger carriers do? Any advice on creating a circuit ID
> format
> > for a brand new fiber network?
> >
> >
> >  Originally we ran a CLEC using a LECs copper, and our circuit ID was
> > historically a telephone number for DSL circuits. The ILEC had a complex
> > method for assigning circuit IDs.
> >
> > I am sure anything will work as long as you keep track of it, but any
> > advice would be great!
> >
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 12:37:08 -0400
> From: Jared Mauch <jared at puck.nether.net>
> To: Tassos Chatzithomaoglou <achatz at forthnet.gr>
> Cc: NANOG <nanog at nanog.org>
> Subject: Re: Creating a Circuit ID Format
> Message-ID: <2AF810AB-E963-4CD4-867C-3D96B73A4C8C at puck.nether.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
>
> > On Aug 22, 2017, at 12:01 PM, Tassos Chatzithomaoglou <
> achatz at forthnet.gr> wrote:
> >
> > I don't know if it has any relation to your issue, but we use Circuit-ID
> to uniquely identify the access node plus the customer's access loop
> logical port on the access node.
> > Access node can be either a DSLAM, a switch, an OLT, etc.
> >
> > You may have a look at BBF's TR-101 (section 3.9.3)  or TR-156 (section
> 5.7) for syntax guide .
>
>
> My favorite circuit-ids were those from MFS where it had the service type
> (2 chars i think) + a pop-code + z pop-code + service count number.
>
> We could then tell what pop/facility everything was handed off at easily
> enough.  I think my house even got a MFS pop code at one time due to the T1
> which was there.
>
> - Jared
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 10:21:32 -0700
> From: Dave Temkin <dave at temk.in>
> To: "North American Network Operators' Group" <nanog at nanog.org>
> Subject: 2017 NANOG Elections General Information
> Message-ID:
>         <[email protected]
> mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
>
> Hello NANOGers!
>
> We are once again approaching the annual NANOG election
> <http://nanog.org/elections/2017/general> and appointment time. Board
> candidate nominations open August 7th and the complete Election timeline
> can be found here <http://nanog.org/elections/2017/general>. We encourage
> those in the community who are not currently NANOG members to consider
> becoming members of NANOG and to consider standing for a position in our
> leadership. Through membership and voting, you will be an active
> participant in directing all NANOG activities.
>
> Only NANOG members are eligible to nominate, be a candidate, vote, and
> serve in the NANOG Board of Directors and Committees.  Click here
> <https://www.nanog.org/membership> to become a member today!  **If you are
> not a member and wish to vote in this election, your membership must be
> received by 9:00 a.m. Pacific Time on Wednesday, October 4, 2017.**
>
> Why?
>
> NANOG is at its strongest and best when there is an engaged group of
> members. If you care about NANOG and would like to take a turn at
> volunteering your time, please consider becoming part of the team by taking
> part in the nomination and election process. If you know someone else that
> you believe would be interested in serving on the Board of Directors,
> nominate them by completing the Online Process
> <https://www.bigpulse.com/138028/signin> beginning August 7, 2017.  Any
> questions should be submitted to elections at nanog.org.
>
> As I spoke about during my opening at NANOG 70, diversity is key to the
> viability of the NANOG community. Personally, it concerns me that our only
> non-white, non-male elected member of the Board is leaving the board this
> year, having served the maximum allowable number of terms. While everyone
> is welcome, it is important that we represent our community well at all
> levels and so if you or someone you know could help improve that
> representation, please consider the nomination process.
>
> As NANOG continues to evolve, our Board of Directors and Committees will
> continue to play an increasingly important role in our success. By joining
> now, you can be an integral part of the process.
>
> For more information about the role of a Board of Director or any Committee
> Member, or to find out more about what's involved in serving, please
> consult the current NANOG Bylaws
> <https://nanog.org/sites/default/files/sites/default/files/NANOG-Bylaws-
> October2016.pdf>
> or follow the links to the Board and Committee pages from the General 2017
> NANOG Elections Page <https://www.nanog.org/elections/2017/general>.
>
>
> Best regards,
>
> Dave Temkin
> On behalf of the NANOG Board of Directors
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 16:50:40 -0400 (EDT)
> From: "Justin M. Streiner" <streinerj at gmail.com>
> To: James Bensley <jwbensley at gmail.com>
> Cc: NANOG <nanog at nanog.org>
> Subject: Re: Creating a Circuit ID Format
> Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.4.64.1708221608470.25675 at whammy.cluebyfour.org>
> Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed
>
> On Tue, 22 Aug 2017, James Bensley wrote:
>
> > In my opinion the circuit ID should be an abitrary (but unique) value
> > and nothing more. As Nick suggested start at 1 and go up. If your
> > company is called ABC Ltd then maybe have your first circuit ID as
> > ABC00000001 and count up from there, it's as simple as that.
> >
> > For me, all the circuit ID should be is a record number/ID of a
> > database entry and nothing more (or a search string). Some people like
> > to have circuit IDs which include circuit types, or circuit speeds, or
> > interface type, but as you asked, do you then change the circuit ID if
> > the circuit speed changes, or the interface types changes, or the
> > medium etc?
>
> Agreed.  I designed something similar at a previous employer, and it just
> used a date-coded ID with sequence number (ex: UOP 20170822.0001), and
> then all of the cross-connect details were recorded in a place that was
> better suited to capturing that sort of information.  That would also
> allow us to re-use fiber paths when we upgraded 1G links to 10G, etc.
>
> This also included IDs that could reference other circuit IDs - including
> circuit IDs from other providers - so we could tie non-dark elements
> together, such as waves through DWDM gear end up riding on separate dark
> fiber paths on either side of the mux.
>
> The biggest obstacle was getting people to label fiber jumpers in the
> field, but that obstacle went away as people get a better understanding of
> it and having all of the cross-connects documented saved lots of time and
> frustration when having to search through a large patch field at 3 AM...
>
> jms
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 22:20:20 +0100
> From: Nick Hilliard <nick at foobar.org>
> To: James Bensley <jwbensley at gmail.com>
> Cc: NANOG <nanog at nanog.org>
> Subject: Re: Creating a Circuit ID Format
> Message-ID: <599CA014.5020704 at foobar.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>
> James Bensley wrote:
> > In my opinion the circuit ID should be an abitrary (but unique) value
> > and nothing more. As Nick suggested start at 1 and go up. If your
> > company is called ABC Ltd then maybe have your first circuit ID as
> > ABC00000001 and count up from there, it's as simple as that.
>
> there are a lot of ways of handling this, which broadly speaking break
> down into whether you want to encode data in your circuit ID or whether
> you want it to act as nothing more than an index on a database table.
>
> Regardless of what way you go about things, there are some parallel
> issues, including whether you want inline checksumming, whether you want
> random value increases or +1 increases, and whether you want an
> alphanumeric or strictly numeric ID.  Alphanumeric can allow unique
> prefixes or suffixes to help identify who owns a circuit ID or what type
> it is, at the complexity of adding identifiers which can be
> misinterpreted over the phone.
>
> There are differing opinions on whether other information such as
> service type, node location, speed, etc should be encoded in the service
> name.
>
> Things that most people generally agree on include:
>
> - carefully splitting out service types.  E.g. a fibre cable to a
> location is one ID; a wavelength on that service is another ID of
> another type; an IP transit service on that wave is a third ID, etc.
>
> - don't reuse IDs, ever.  There are plenty of numbers out there.
>
> - don't change from one ID mechanism to another, if possible.
>
> Otherwise, for every well-reasoned suggestion to use a specific format,
> there are other well-reasoned arguments to do things in a different way.
>  Choose one and stick with it.
>
> Nick
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 21:44:24 -0400
> From: Andrew Kirch <trelane at trelane.net>
> To: NANOG list <nanog at nanog.org>
> Subject: Spectrum web cache engineer
> Message-ID:
>         <CALA5tJLpNQBpE0gJne6VrPy7FPLfQjm5GMYwSj9Zr+=ZgaEHzg at mail.
> gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
>
> Would a Spectrum engineer please contact me off list?  It appears you're
> caching an expired certificate for https://www.icei.org.
>
> The issue is tested/working everywhere else.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Andrew
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 7
> Date: Wed, 23 Aug 2017 08:18:52 +0000
> From: Timothy Creswick <timothy at creswick.eu>
> To: NANOG <nanog at nanog.org>
> Subject: RE: Creating a Circuit ID Format
> Message-ID:
>         <HE1PR05MB15644799780F432E10AC93ADAF850 at HE1PR05MB1564.
> eurprd05.prod.outlook.com>
>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> > Things that most people generally agree on include:
> >
> > - carefully splitting out service types.  E.g. a fibre cable to a
> > location is one ID; a wavelength on that service is another ID of
> > another type; an IP transit service on that wave is a third ID, etc.
>
> Definitely. We have one digit in our circuit ID which denotes the type to
> aid with quick identification.
>
> We also use a luhn-10 checksum digit at the end, which is optional on
> re-entry. This is really helpful when getting references over the phone.
> When written, it's with a hyphen so that it's clear that it's able to be
> dropped.
>
> A few things we also decided on:
>
> - Circuit references are purely numerical (although we prefix them with
> letters when written, those letters are not part of what makes the numbers
> unique in our business). The main reason for this is that they can easily
> be entered in a variety of *compact* barcode formats. Most label printers
> support this, and it saves loads of time in the datacentre when you can
> just scan the label on a circuit on a handheld PC.
>
> - Circuit references are always the same length. This way, if the checksum
> digit is being dropped (e.g. because it's coming from a non-human source
> like a barcode), we know that the checksum digit is missing.
>
> - The first digit is never a zero, to avoid silly mistakes if you're
> sorting them in Excel etc.
>
> - The first four digits are a simple date code of YYMM that the ID was
> generated. This is surprisingly handy when you're looking for a specific
> circuit reference in a list, and it sort of helps to spread the dataset out
> a bit. This is what ensures that it's a non-zero first digit for the next
> 80 years or so. The date code isn't a *requirement* of our format, however.
> Should we need more than 10,000 circuits per month, we'll just abandon the
> date coding.
>
> For those interested, our system looks like this:
>
> VCI-150600019-7
>
> Any non [0-9] characters (including symbols) can be omitted.
>
> VCI : denotes that this circuit identifier corresponds to our business
> 1506 : date code
> 0001 : sequence number, incremented per circuit, per month
> 9 : circuit type
> 7 : checksum (optional)
>
> T
>
>
> End of NANOG Digest, Vol 115, Issue 21
> **************************************
>



-- 

-Steve Lerner (m) 212-495-9212



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