Softlayer / Blocking Cuba IP's ?

Pavel Odintsov pavel.odintsov at gmail.com
Sun Feb 21 11:45:38 UTC 2016


Hello!

I have other question.

Why somebody exists in this list?

Nobody should be in this block list actually. If you ban some country
because this country is bad (so really? One countries are worse than
other, really? Who care in this evaluations? Some yet another "smart"
government?)

If you ask for block somebody you are becoming  the worst person on
the Whole Earth. This songs really like Internet Nazism.

Just imagine world where you should drop all packets from martians
because your government thinks they are stupid. Songs like Orwell
1984. Not so perfect way.

>From my point if view nobody should block North Korea, Cuba or
definitely Crimea because Internet is not is the politic game field.
It's way to communicate. Both bad and good people could use it and
nobody should care about "who can".



On Sun, Feb 21, 2016 at 2:16 PM, Max Tulyev <maxtul at netassist.ua> wrote:
> Why Crimea still not in the list?
>
> On 20.02.16 02:57, frnkblk at iname.com wrote:
>> Official statement here: https://knowledgelayer.softlayer.com/faq/softlayer-network-wide-ip-blocking
>>
>> Frank
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: NANOG [mailto:nanog-bounces+frnkblk=iname.com at nanog.org] On Behalf Of Faisal Imtiaz
>> Sent: Friday, February 19, 2016 5:21 PM
>> To: Carlos A. Carnero Delgado <carloscarnero at gmail.com>
>> Cc: nanog list <nanog at nanog.org>
>> Subject: Re: Softlayer / Blocking Cuba IP's ?
>>
>> Ola Carlos,
>>
>> I am very familiar with Govt. instituted restrictions, and yes, people always find ways to get around it. I cannot speak for the Cuban Gov. nor for the US Gov. as to what they decide to do and when.
>>
>> What was/is irksome about Softlayer's decision is the following:-
>>
>> 1) Unilateral implementation of a restricted policy without any notification.
>>
>> 2) The broad stroke implementation of a Gov Policy that does not apply to the communication service they applied the policy to.
>>
>> i.e. As much as we all dislike Dictatorial Behavior, and we fully recognize Softlayer is a Private Entity, who can exercise it's right to act Dictatorially, Such behavior in the overall community (Internet) is frowned upon and (as it should) have a long term negative affect to business.
>>
>> Saludos.
>>
>> Faisal Imtiaz
>> Snappy Internet & Telecom
>> 7266 SW 48 Street
>> Miami, FL 33155
>> Tel: 305 663 5518 x 232
>>
>> Help-desk: (305)663-5518 Option 2 or Email: Support at Snappytelecom.net
>>
>>> From: "Carlos A. Carnero Delgado" <carloscarnero at gmail.com>
>>> To: "Faisal Imtiaz" <faisal at snappytelecom.net>
>>> Cc: "nanog list" <nanog at nanog.org>
>>> Sent: Friday, February 19, 2016 6:08:42 PM
>>> Subject: Re: Softlayer / Blocking Cuba IP's ?
>>
>>> Hi,
>>
>>> (disclaimer: I'm Cuban national, living in Cuba, and a long time lurker in this
>>> great list)
>>
>>> 2016-02-19 15:27 GMT-05:00 Faisal Imtiaz < faisal at snappytelecom.net > :
>>
>>>> Considering the fact that such a block was just put in place about a week ago ?
>>>> Last time I checked, blocking any part of the world is not part of any legal
>>>> requirements on any Global Service Provider ? other than a 'company policy' ?
>>
>>> Being denied access to services, as a Cuban national, is something that we've
>>> all experienced here and we (sadly) have come to accept it as a fact of life.
>>> Sometimes we resort to proxies/VPNs in order to conceal our origin -- and by a
>>> similar token, sometimes, our destination ;).
>>
>>> However, there are a couple of things that have made me wondering how arbitrary
>>> decisions can be. I think sometimes it just boils down to specific provider
>>> policies that try to (maybe rightfully) cover their bottoms in the light of the
>>> law. For instance, I can't hide the fact that I have access to Gmail; but at
>>> the same time there are many Google properties and services than I can't. There
>>> are many companies, global companies, that I can't access, and others are open
>>> to us which are, paradoxically, completely based on the US and under US law
>>> (won't name them publicly to avoid potential damage).
>>
>>> Any way, I'm going back to lurk mode. However, feel free to ask anything, on- of
>>> offlist. And I thank you all for this wonderful resource.
>>> Carlos.
>>
>>
>>
>



-- 
Sincerely yours, Pavel Odintsov


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