content regulation, was Verizon Policy Statement on Net Neutrality

Dave Taht dave.taht at gmail.com
Mon Mar 2 02:03:03 UTC 2015


On Sun, Mar 1, 2015 at 5:53 PM, Owen DeLong <owen at delong.com> wrote:
>
>> On Mar 1, 2015, at 14:01 , John R. Levine <johnl at iecc.com> wrote:
>>
>>>>>> Well, actually, it does.  Every broadband network in the US
>>>>>> currently blocks outgoing port 25 connections from retail customers.
>>>>>
>>>>> Unfortunately, that's not entirely true.  (Very) recent direct-to-MX spam
>>>>> from Comcast customers:
>>>>
>>>> Well, it's supposed to be blocked, according to people I've talked to
>>>> at Comcast and T-W as recently as a week ago.  I can believe that they
>>>> have configuration problems on a networks of that size.
>>>
>>> fairly certain that none of these folk block port 25 on their business
>>> customer links.
>>
>> As I said above, retail customers.  Business customers get static IPs and generaly no blocking.
>>
>> R's,
>> John
>
> Business customers only get static from Comcast if they pay extra for it.

I still keep hoping for some way to buy an ipv6/48 from them. Being
dynamically renumbered all the time is a PITA, and yet, when comcast's
ipv6 works - it is GREAT. I had huge amounts of nat pressure from dns
traffic simply vanish once I switched my dns servers over to their
ipv6 (and deployed dnssec and got back NXDOMAIN)

>
> Owen
>



-- 
Dave Täht
Let's make wifi fast, less jittery and reliable again!

https://plus.google.com/u/0/107942175615993706558/posts/TVX3o84jjmb


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