Buying IP Bandwidth Across a Peering Exchange

Justin Wilson lists at mtin.net
Wed Nov 26 01:23:09 UTC 2014


The way our exchange works is 2 different products in regards to this.

1.Peering on the exchange.  This is a BGP exchange.
2.Private VLAN.  Each side gets a private VLAN between the two.

Either way you buy capacity on the exchange and it¹s up to you how you use
it.

I have some Equinix documents on their exchange port offerings if you are
interested.

Justin


--
Justin Wilson <j2sw at mtin.net>
http://www.mtin.net
Managed Services ­ xISP Solutions ­ Data Centers
http://www.thebrotherswisp.com
Podcast about xISP topics
http://www.midwest-ix.com
Peering ­ Transit ­ Internet Exchange




On 11/25/14, 4:29 PM, "Faisal Imtiaz" <faisal at snappytelecom.net> wrote:

>Hi Colton,
>
>The primary challenge in buying IP Transit across a Peering Exchange is
>not so much of a technical configuration challenge, but rather a 'how do
>we keep track of how much IP Transit you are using' ..a billing challenge.
>
>and additionally, one is making the assumption that there is capacity to
>do so on the IP Transit Providers Peering Port Connection.
>
>While it is possible to deal with such issue, but you need someone
>willing and able to do so, on the other side.
>
>
>------------------------
>> I think the way most providers would do this would be to get a rack and
>> power with Equinix. Pay a cross connect fee from the wave provider to
>>our
>> rack. Pay for an exchange port (which includes a cross connect to the
>> exchange) for the 5GBPS of traffic going to Netflix, Google, etc. And
>>then
>> pay for yet another cross connect going to HE.net's cage to get pure IP
>> from them.
>-------------------------
>
>Yes, you are right, this is the traditional way of doing so, and yes, it
>can get expensive.. For this exact reason, folks such as us and others
>who are willing to provide access via their existing resources at
>different facilities.
>
>We are facilitating flexible connectivity needs of folks who are running
>remote (from major metro areas) such as yours, in Miami, Atlanta, and I
>know others who are doing so in Equinox Chicago, one in Texas and a
>couple of the West Coast.
>
>Feel free to ping me off list if you are interested in additional details.
>
>
>Regards
>
>Faisal Imtiaz
>Snappy Internet & Telecom
>7266 SW 48 Street
>Miami, FL 33155
>Tel: 305 663 5518 x 232
>
>Help-desk: (305)663-5518 Option 2 or Email: Support at Snappytelecom.net
>
>----- Original Message -----
>> From: "Colton Conor" <colton.conor at gmail.com>
>> To: "Ammar Zuberi" <ammar at fastreturn.net>
>> Cc: "NANOG" <nanog at nanog.org>
>> Sent: Tuesday, November 25, 2014 2:51:47 PM
>> Subject: Re: Buying IP Bandwidth Across a Peering Exchange
>> 
>> The exchange in question is Equinix. Their sales team is leading me
>> to believe there are multiple exchange products. One where you can peer
>> with providers (Google, Netflix for example) and then one where you can
>> create virtual private layer 2 vlans between providers. Then there is
>>also
>> the traditional cross connect fee of $350 if you want to go from one
>> cage/rack to the other.
>> 
>> So in a situation where we are getting a 10Gig transport wave to
>>Equinix,
>> we would ideally like to split this wave's use to 5Gbps of traffic
>>going to
>> the peering exchange for traffic going directly to Google, Netflix, and
>> other CDN's, and then 5Gbps of pure IP transit going to a low cost
>>provider
>> like HE.net. Of course providers like HE.NET are also peers on the
>>peering
>> exchange, so it seems possible that we could just opening a peering
>> conenction with them.
>> 
>> I think the way most providers would do this would be to get a rack and
>> power with Equinix. Pay a cross connect fee from the wave provider to
>>our
>> rack. Pay for an exchange port (which includes a cross connect to the
>> exchange) for the 5GBPS of traffic going to Netflix, Google, etc. And
>>then
>> pay for yet another cross connect going to HE.net's cage to get pure IP
>> from them.
>> 
>> If I can buy transit directly I avoid the expenses of having to pay for
>> space, power, another router/switch, plus a second cross connect. Thats
>> quite a bit of money saved.
>> 
>> Are exchanges really that unreliable compared to a traditional cross
>> connect?
>> 
>> On Tue, Nov 25, 2014 at 12:52 PM, Ammar Zuberi <ammar at fastreturn.net>
>>wrote:
>> 
>> > Hi Conor,
>> >
>> > I know this is possible since Hurricane Electric does it for IPv6
>>transit,
>> > however, I'm not sure if it violates any exchange rules or if it's
>>even a
>> > good idea.
>> >
>> > > On 25 Nov 2014, at 10:47 pm, Colton Conor <colton.conor at gmail.com>
>> > wrote:
>> > >
>> > > I know typically peering exchanges are made for peering traffic
>>between
>> > > providers, but can you buy IP transit from a provider on an
>>exchange? An
>> > > example, buy a 10G port on an exchange, peer 5Gbps of traffic with
>> > multiple
>> > > providers on the exchange, and buy 5Gbps of IP transit from others
>>on the
>> > > exchange?
>> > >
>> > > Some might ask why not get a cross connect to the provider. It is
>>cheaper
>> > > to buy an port on the exchange (which includes the cross connect to
>>the
>> > > exchange) than buy multiple cross connects. Plus we are planning on
>> > getting
>> > > a wave to the exchange, and not having any physical routers or
>>switches
>> > at
>> > > the datacenter where the exchange/wave terminates at. Is this
>>possible?
>> >
>> 
>




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