Coded TCP

Daniël W. Crompton daniel.crompton at gmail.com
Wed Oct 24 07:39:17 UTC 2012


On 24 October 2012 08:35, Masataka Ohta <mohta at necom830.hpcl.titech.ac.jp>wrote:

> (2012/10/24 12:29), Rodrick Brown wrote:
> > "With coded TCP, blocks of packets are clumped together and then
> > transformed into algebraic equations that describe the packets. If
> > part of the message is lost, the receiver can solve the equation to
> > derive the missing data.
>
> Don't do that.
>

This reads much like Reed-Solomon Error Correction[1], although it is a
good way to reconstruct lost data it introduces a network overhead and a
performance impact due to the reconstruction. The analysis states: "*the
receiver will receive at least 10 linear combinations to decode the
original 10 packets.*" Which reads to me as we need 10 packets of error
correction data to reconstruct 10 packets.

The only advantage I can see here, is that it would outperform UDP. :)

D.


1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reed%E2%80%93Solomon_error_correction

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Daniël W. Crompton <daniel.crompton at gmail.com>

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