Megaupload.com seized

Roland Perry lists at internetpolicyagency.com
Fri Jan 20 21:26:11 UTC 2012


In article <20120120200216.GA62670 at ussenterprise.ufp.org>, Leo Bicknell 
<bicknell at ufp.org> writes
>Also, when using a hashed file store, it's possible that some uses
>are infringing and some are not.  I might make a movie, put it on
>Megaupload, and then give the links only to the 5 people who bought
>it from them.  One of them might turn around, upload it again to
>Megaupload, and share it with the world, infringing on my content.
>I would hope that when I issue a takedown notice they take down the
>infringers copy (link), but leave mine in place.

It's been suggested that many movies which have been made widely 
available without the film company's permission were derived from 
legitimate copies supplied to reviewers.

This is a similar issue to the unfortunate AUP of some access providers 
that say users are prohibited from downloading any copyrighted material, 
when the majority of websites are exactly that.

In Europe we have a Copyright Directive which seeks to legitimise what 
could be termed "incidental copying" involved in using a browser, and 
I'm happy to say I was one of the industry people who persuaded a 
sceptical previous generation of media lawyers that this was OK.
-- 
Roland Perry




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