juniper mx80 vs cisco asr 1000

Skeeve Stevens skeeve at eintellego.net
Thu Jan 19 22:19:14 CST 2012


The ASR1000 series are like most Ciscos, they can be used for a lot of
things.  They are a swiss-army knife of routers and basically are the
upgrade from the Cisco 7200 series.

If you want low level LNS functionality, then the Cisco is the way to go as
the Juniper MX80 does not have LNS functionality (and looks like it never
will).

But if you are looking for a beast of a border router for BGP and so on,
then the MX80 (MX5/10/40/80) kick ass with their throughput.  MX80 series
are also supposed to be supporting Virtual Chassis at some point (was
supposed to be now, but I hear it is delayed).

We're deploying a variety of MX5, MX10's for different projects at the
moment.

The other thing is that the MX80 platform, comes in very cheap options like
the MX5 - with 20Gb of TP and 20Gig interfaces at under 25k, that is
awesome. The MX5/10/40 are the exact same hardware and you can just upgrade
with a license.  The base MX5 has 4 * 10GbE interfaces which aren't usable
until you go to MX40 (2 of them) or MX80 (all 4).  But in an MX10, with the
second slot active, you can put in a 2 port 10GbE card which works just
fine.

…Skeeve

On Fri, Jan 20, 2012 at 8:43 AM, Ariel Biener <ariel at post.tau.ac.il> wrote:

>  On 01/19/2012 11:40 PM, Leigh Porter wrote:
>
>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: jon Heise [mailto:jon at smugmug.com]
>>> Sent: 19 January 2012 21:37
>>> To: nanog at nanog.org
>>> Subject: juniper mx80 vs cisco asr 1000
>>>
>>> Does anyone have any experience with these two routers, we're looking
>>> to buy one of them but i have little experience dealing with cisco
>>> routers and zero experience with juniper.
>>>
>> I have lots of MX80s and they have all been fantastic. But if you have no
>> experience of Juniper it will be a different learning curve (one that is,
>> IMO, worth the effort).
>>
>> I have not used the asr1000 but it looks like a capable box. You would do
>> well to look at the MX80 fixed chassis, it comes with 48 1G interfaces and
>> 4 10G interfaces. They are pretty good value, I think.
>>
>
> It well depends on your requirements (not talking about throughput).
> The ASR1000 series is a "services" box. It does more in terms of
> services (using license enablers) than the MX80 does, and it costs
> more.
>
> So, it very much depends on what you want to do with the boxes.
>
>
> --Ariel
>
>>
>> --
>> Leigh Porter
>>
>>
>>
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>
> --
>  --
>  Ariel Biener
>  e-mail: ariel at post.tau.ac.il
>  PGP: http://www.tau.ac.il/~ariel/**pgp.html<http://www.tau.ac.il/~ariel/pgp.html>
>
>
>


-- 

*Skeeve Stevens, CEO*
eintellego Pty Ltd
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