coprorations using BGP for advertising prefixes in mid-1990s

[email protected] packetgrrl at gmail.com
Thu May 12 18:24:14 CDT 2011


My name is Cathy and I used to EGP.  :-)  wow that's a blast from the past.
In the late 80s the NSFNet used EGP.  That's why the RADB came to be.  EGP
only tolerated one route to any destination.  Otherwise lots of fun loops.
 :-)

Kevin, when I configured ESNet to go from EGP to BGP (in the early 90s) we
hit what I call a Yakov limit.  We were like the 64th BGP peer and the
NSFNET shut down completely.  It was a total riot.

Thanks for the memories!
----Cathy

On Thu, May 12, 2011 at 3:37 PM, Kevin Oberman <oberman at es.net> wrote:

> > Date: Thu, 12 May 2011 17:15:17 -0400
> > From: Dorn Hetzel <dorn at hetzel.org>
> >
> > >
> > >
> > > The actual number would be considerably smaller as there were large
> > > (for some definition of large) block assignments of ASNs <~1000 or so
> > > to various academic networking entities such as NSFNet and regional
> > > networks as well as other Federal/Military networking organisations.
> > >
> > > -dorian
> > >
> > >
> > Well, for one data point, I was issued 3492 around Spring of 1994.
> >
>
> Does no one remember EGP? ASNs are MUCH older than BGP. And we were
> using BGPv3 prior to the existence of V4. We used BGPv4 back in the days
> when Tony Li would chastise us for reporting a bug in a 10 day old Cisco
> build saying that we could not expect BGPv4 code over a week old to
> work. He felt that we should deploy new code daily.
>
> The big push was to have v4 available before the old PRDB was frozen by
> Merit/NSFnet. (And, who remembers the PRDB?)
> --
> R. Kevin Oberman, Network Engineer
> Energy Sciences Network (ESnet)
> Ernest O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab)
> E-mail: oberman at es.net                  Phone: +1 510 486-8634
> Key fingerprint:059B 2DDF 031C 9BA3 14A4  EADA 927D EBB3 987B 3751
>
>



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