HIJACKED: 148.163.0.0/16 -- WTF? Level3 is now doing IP hijacking??

Owen DeLong owen at delong.com
Thu Mar 31 00:57:40 CDT 2011


On Mar 30, 2011, at 10:26 PM, Suresh Ramasubramanian wrote:

> It also needs
> 
> 1. Someone to complain to law enforcement
> 
True,

> 2. Law enforcement to decide this is something worth following up on
> re prosecution - especially if the crook is not within their
> jurisdiction, it'd be FBI, and they have a minimum threshold for
> damage caused (higher than the few thousand dollars a /16's
> registration fees cost?)
> 
Not necessarily...

If the crook is in another county, same state, it could be simple extradition.

If the crook is across state lines, it could still be handled as an extradition,
but, slightly more complicated.

If the crook is on the other side of an international boundary, that's a whole
new ball of wax and the number of permutations of regulatory combinations
involved prevents any rational enumeration here.

Owen

> [not counting 7.5 million bucks paid in aftermarket deals like
> microsoft from nortel]
> 
> --srs
> 
> On Thu, Mar 31, 2011 at 10:45 AM, Owen DeLong <owen at delong.com> wrote:
>> If they put it on letterhead and signed their own name in such a way that it purports
>> to be an agent of the organization for which they were not an authorized agent, that
>> is usually enough to become a criminal act, whether it is considered forgery, fraud,
>> or something else, I'm not sure about the exact technicalities and they may vary
>> by jurisdiction.
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Suresh Ramasubramanian (ops.lists at gmail.com)





More information about the NANOG mailing list