What's the current state of major access networks in North America ipv6 delivery status?

Brzozowski, John John_Brzozowski at Cable.Comcast.com
Thu Jan 27 05:57:04 CST 2011


In order to deploy /56 to end users would require an IPv6 /24 be dedicated
to 6rd, /48s would require a dedicated IPv6 /16.  This assumes an operator
wants/needs to provide IPv6 via 6rd to end users where their IPv4 address
is fully unique.  There is quite a bit of IPv6 address space that does not
gets utilized in this model.

The routers we are using as part of the trials only support /64 as such we
are using an IPv6 /32.

It is also important that operators plan for the ability to delegate
prefixes that are shorter than a /64.  There are several cases that we
have seen where the router can only make use of a /64.  This is better
than nothing when referring to legacy devices that have been able to
introduce some support for IPv6 and would have otherwise been IPv4 only
devices.

John
=========================================
John Jason Brzozowski
Comcast Cable
e) mailto:john_brzozowski at cable.comcast.com
o) 609-377-6594
m) 484-962-0060
w) http://www.comcast6.net
=========================================




On 1/26/11 5:02 PM, "Owen DeLong" <owen at delong.com> wrote:

>
>On Jan 26, 2011, at 1:52 PM, Charles N Wyble wrote:
>
>> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
>> Hash: SHA1
>> 
>> 
>> Is anyone tracking the major consumer/business class access networks
>> delivery of ipv6 in North America?
>> 
>> I'm on ATT DSL. It looks like they want to use 6rd? I've only briefly
>> looked into 6rd. Is this a dead end path/giant hack?
>> 
>> 
>>https://sites.google.com/site/ipv6implementors/2010/agenda/05_Chase_Googl
>>econf-BroadbandtransitiontoIPv6using6rd.pdf?attredirects=0
>> 
>It's a fairly ugly way to deliver IPv6, but, as transition technologies
>go, it's the least dead-end of the options.
>
>It at least provides essentially native dual stack environment. The
>only difference is that your IPv6 access is via a tunnel. You'll probably
>be limited to a /56 or less over 6rd, unfortunately, but, because of the
>awful way 6rd consumes addresses, handing out /48s would be
>utterly impractical. Free.fr stuck their customers with /60s, which is
>hopefully a very temporary situation.
>
>> 
>> I spoke with impulse.net last year, which appears to serve large
>> portions of the AT&T cable plant in Southern California. They were
>> willing to offer native ipv6. Not sure how (one /64, a /48) etc.
>> 
>You should definitely push your providers to give you a /48 if
>possible. If /56 or worse /60 or worst of all, /64 become widespread
>trends, it may significantly impact, delay, or even prevent innovations
>in the end-user networking/consumer electronics markets.
>
>Owen
>
>





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