Overall Netflix bandwidth usage numbers on a network?

Patrick W. Gilmore patrick at ianai.net
Mon Dec 12 14:10:20 CST 2011


On Dec 12, 2011, at 12:18 AM, Joel jaeggli wrote:
> On 12/11/11 19:49 , Christopher Morrow wrote:
>> On Sun, Dec 11, 2011 at 10:46 PM, Faisal Imtiaz <faisal at snappydsl.net> wrote:
>>> Simple, keep traffic off paid ip transit circuits....
>>> 
>> (I think joel's point was: "peer with amazon, done-and-done")
> 
> also probably your relationships to akamai and level3

Netflix's EC2 instances do not speak to end users AFAIK.  I believe Akamai, LLNW, & L3 are the only companies that stream movies for Netflix.  Peer with the CDNs to save your transit.

Happy to be educated otherwise if someone knows more than I do.

Netflix's client is also _very_ intelligent.  If a user cannot get high enough quality from CDN_1, it will switch to CDN_2 without interrupting the stream.  Which is nice if you have good connectivity to one but not the other CDN.  (Note I spoke of "good", not "inexpensive" connectivity.  The NF client doesn't know how much it costs you to show a video, only whether there is packet loss.)

-- 
TTFN,
patrick


>>> Faisal
>>> 
>>> On Dec 11, 2011, at 10:21 PM, Joel Jaeggli <joelja at bogus.com> wrote:
>>> 
>>>> Netflix uses CDNs for content delivery and the platform runs in EC2. What would peering with them achieve?
>>>> 
>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>> 
>>>> On Dec 11, 2011, at 18:06, Faisal Imtiaz <faisal at snappydsl.net> wrote:
>>>> 
>>>>> Which leads to a question to be asked...
>>>>> 
>>>>> Is netflix willing to peer directly with ISP / NSP's ?
>>>>> 
>>>>> Regards.
>>>>> 
>>>>> Faisal Imtiaz
>>>>> Snappy Internet&  Telecom
>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>>> On 12/11/2011 7:29 PM, Dave Temkin wrote:
>>>>>> Feel free to contact peering at netflix<dot>com - we're happy to provide you with delivery statistics for traffic terminating on your network.
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Regards,
>>>>>> -Dave Temkin
>>>>>> Netflix
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> On 12/7/11 8:57 AM, Blake Hudson wrote:
>>>>>>> Yeah, that's an interesting one. We currently utilize netflow for this, but you also need to consider that netflix streaming is just port 80 www traffic. Because netflix uses CDNs, its difficult to pin down the traffic to specific hosts in the CDN and say that this traffic was netflix, while this traffic was the latest windows update (remember this is often a shared hosting platform). We've done our own testing and have come to a good solution which uses a combination of nbar, packet marking, and netflow to come to a conclusion. On a ~160Mbps link, netflix peaks out between 30-50Mbps around 8-10PM each evening. The rest of the traffic is predominantly other forms of HTTP traffic (including other video streaming services).
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> Martin Hepworth wrote the following on 12/3/2011 2:36 AM:
>>>>>>>> Also checkout Adrian Cockcroft presentations on their architecture which
>>>>>>>> describes how they use aws and CDns etc
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> Martin
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>> 
>>> 
>> 
> 
> 




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