US hunters shoot down Google fibre

Kevin Neal kevin at safelink.net
Tue Sep 21 13:38:29 CDT 2010


I guess it depends on whether these are wooden poles or the metal towers
that I find around here for long haul power.

-Kevin


On Tue, Sep 21, 2010 at 12:18 PM, Mark Keymer <mark at viviotech.net> wrote:

> Hi Kevin,
>
> That is easy. "Tree Climbing Spurs / Tree Climbing Spikes" A quick
> Google search found these for sale. http://wesspur.com/spurs/spurs.html
>
> :)
>
> Sincerely,
>
> Mark
>
>
> Kevin Neal wrote:
> > How are the guys sent out on cross-country skis going to get up to the
> fiber
> > to repair it?  I'm sure that the cable isn't low enough for them to reach
> it
> > without a ladder, bucket truck, helicopter....  all of which you don't
> pack
> > in on skis...
> >
> >
> > -Kevin
> >
> > On Tue, Sep 21, 2010 at 12:02 PM, Seth Mattinen <sethm at rollernet.us>
> wrote:
> >
> >
> >> On 9/21/2010 10:52, Holmes,David A wrote:
> >>
> >>> Modern telephone pole aerial fiber uses all dialectric self-supporting
> >>> (ADSS) technology, where the self-supporting component consists
> >>> primarily of aramid yarn, the same material used for bullet-proof
> vests.
> >>> This makes for an extremely light weight, almost indestructible fiber
> >>> bundle. My guess is that ADSS fiber would deflect any bullets, or it
> >>> would take a very good marksman using a very high caliber weapon to
> >>> actually sever an aerial fiber.
> >>>
> >>> Now in the case described below where optical ground wire (OPGW) fiber
> >>> is used as a component in the ground wire running at the top of high
> >>> voltage transmission towers, it may be possible to hit the insulators
> at
> >>> the top of the towers, but the ground wire itself is usually armored,
> >>> with ADSS inside. Seems far-fetched to me.
> >>>
> >>>
> >> Back in my ISP days it was more common for people to take pot shots at
> >> remote equipment cabinets than the cable/fiber itself. Any field
> >> enclosure is as easy a target as your average bullet-ridden road sign.
> >> Although this was extremely rare; I can only recall one instance where
> >> it was the direct cause of an outage.
> >>
> >> ~Seth
> >>
> >>
> >>
>
>
>



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