Blocking International DNS

Leen Besselink leen at consolejunkie.net
Thu Nov 25 18:00:24 CST 2010


>> And once you get these things in place you never know where it will end...
> That, OTOH, is true. 
>
Actually, we do.

Every time a country creates a list, even though you wouldn't expect it
from these respectable countries, politicians and policemen with their
good intentions, somehow things end up on these lists which should not
be every single time.

Obviously, these lists are secret because otherwise the bad people can
use them as a pointer where to go.

So there is no oversight.

They do however end up on Wikileaks and then you see that their are lots
of other things on these lists.

To start with the websites of the people who oppose such lists and
political movements (even though the countries are democracies).

Or websites like the Pirate Bay, Wikileaks or even Wikipedia.

As we all know, these lists don't work anyway.

So it does not prevent the people who are looking for this content to
get to this content and the people who are performing these acts with
these children are not stopped by this.

One of the most heard arguments the politicians (or more likely from the
lobbyists) is that is it hard to get websites removed or deleted when
they are in other countries. Which may sound plausible until you look at
what Paypal and the banks can a chief, they get websites removed in a
day or 2, mostly hours.

Most of the time by just sending an e-mail or picking up the phone.

I know people can have really heated discussions about these subjects
"think of the kinds", but that does not mean we should not make clear
headed decisions in the end.

An other often heard argument is, but we should prevent all the other
people and especially children from running in to this filth on the
Internet.

Which is also an interesting argument, because people who share this
kind of content do not do this openly, they don't want to be discovered.
They don't use misleading advertisement where people might click on to
lure them in.

As I understand it, they password protect their content or use VPN's and
share links by word of mouth.

Doesn't matter how you look at it, it is much more effective to go after
the people that do this then to argue about or set up these blacklists.

Have a nice day,
    Leen.





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