Solar Flux (was: Re: China prefix hijack)

Leigh Porter leigh.porter at ukbroadband.com
Sun Apr 11 15:39:39 CDT 2010


There is a guy who walks aroung Hyde Park Corner in London with a sandwich board that says "its going to get worse".

Perhaps Ill go and talk to him next weekend and see what he thinks.

-- 
Leigh

--- original message ---
From: "Warren Bailey" <wbailey at gci.com>
Subject: Re: Solar Flux (was: Re: China prefix hijack)
Date: 11th April 2010
Time: 9:14:50 pm

Are we thinking its going to get worse??

Did anyone else see the intelsat spacecraft failure last week??
Sent using my GCI BlackBerry

----- Original Message -----
From: Valdis.Kletnieks at vt.edu <Valdis.Kletnieks at vt.edu>
To: Michael Dillon <wavetossed at googlemail.com>
Cc: Paul Vixie <vixie at isc.org>; Robert E. Seastrom <rs at seastrom.com>; nanog at merit.edu <nanog at merit.edu>
Sent: Sun Apr 11 08:36:05 2010
Subject: Re: Solar Flux (was: Re: China prefix hijack)

On Sun, 11 Apr 2010 16:58:40 BST, Michael Dillon said:

> Would a Faraday cage be sufficient to protect against cosmic ray bit-flipping
> and how could you retrofit a Faraday cage onto a rack or two of gear?

Scientists build neutrino detectors in mines 8,000 feet underground because
that much rock provides *partial* shielding against cosmic rays causing
spurious detection events.

Fortunately, the sun emits almost no cosmic rays.

It does however spew a lot of less energetic particles that will cause
single-bit upsets in electronic gear. Time to double-check that all your
gear has ECC ram - the problem with the UltraSparc CPUs last time was that
they had some cache chips built by IBM.  IBM said "Use these chips in an
ECC config", but Sun didn't.  The ions hit, and the resulting bit-flips
crashed the machines.  Incidentally, Sun sued IBM over that, and the judge
basically said "Well, IBM *told* you not to do that up front. Suit dismissed".

One of the other big issues will be noise on satellite and microwave links
screwing your S/N ratio.

The one that scares me? Inducted currents on long runs of copper. You get a
200-300 mile 765Kva transmission line, and a solar flare hits, the Earth's
magnetic field gets dented, so the field lines move relative to the stationary
copper cable, and suddenly you have several thousand extra amps popping out one
end of that cable. Ka-blam.  The big danger there is that many substations are
not designed for that - so it would basically *permanently* destroy that
substation and they'd get to replace it. And of course, that's a several-weeks
repair even if it's the only one - and in that sort of case, there will be
*dozens* of step-down transformers blown up the same afternoon.

How long can you run on diesel? ;)





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