Network diagram software

Marshall Eubanks tme at multicasttech.com
Wed Feb 11 13:43:16 CST 2009


On Feb 11, 2009, at 2:37 PM, Howard C. Berkowitz wrote:

>
>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Kevin Day [mailto:toasty at dragondata.com]
>> Sent: Wednesday, February 11, 2009 2:16 PM
>> To: Mathias Wolkert
>> Cc: nanog at nanog.org
>> Subject: Re: Network diagram software
>>
>>
>> On Feb 11, 2009, at 7:06 AM, Mathias Wolkert wrote:
>>
>>> I'd like to know what software people are using to document  
>>> networks.
>>> Visio is obvious but feels like a straight jacket to me.
>>> I liked netviz but it seems owned by CA and unsupported nowadays.
>>>
>>> What do you use?
>>>
>>> /Tias
>>
>> Two packages that I'm looking at right now for a project.
>>
>>
>> RackMonkey http://flux.org.uk/projects/rackmonkey/
>>
>> Simple, AJAX-ified, looks very easy to use for non-nerds. Keeps track
>> of rack space allocations, devices, even does some neat tricks using
>> Dell service tags to let you see warranty/config info.
>>
>
> You remind me of  a design discussion, well-lubricated with beer, in  
> which
> my team was trying, in spite of top management, to design great  
> carrier
> routers. At one point, partially for RFC4098 benchmarking, we wanted  
> to put
> a GPS card into some prototypes, originally as a time reference.
>
> We started thinking what else we could do with it, assuming we could  
> get an
> enhanced-accuracy GPS (DGPS/WAAS) signal into the machine room.  
> Physical
> inventory became a possibility. Somewhere, however, it started  
> moving into
> the silly, including oscillation indicating earthquakes, and then  
> graceful
> arcs as the rack fell over.
>
>

Maybe not so silly :

http://gizmodo.com/383605/laptop-accelerometers-used-to-study-earthquakes-desk-bumping

Regards
Marshall







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