how it routes and network question

Kieran Murphy daffy at daffy.za.net
Tue Dec 22 07:32:58 CST 2009


Or these are VPS', and not physical Servers.
>From my brief encounters with various VPS technologies, this makes more
sense.

Regards,
Kieran.


On Tue, Dec 22, 2009 at 12:51 PM, Bruce Forster <bruce at tubes.net.au> wrote:

> I should add; i guess i made some assumption that you were co-locating your
> own servers with someone, if this isn't the case, please ignore everything
> i'v said ;)
>
>
> -bruce
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Truman Boyes [mailto:truman at suspicious.org]
> Sent: Tuesday, 22 December 2009 10:47 PM
> To: Deric Kwok
> Cc: Bruce Forster; nanog at nanog.org
> Subject: Re: how it routes and network question
>
> Hi, your "hosting company" is likely NAT'ing or using load balancers on the
> front end. You are obviously not "reaching" those machines by ssh'ing into
> 192.168.x.x... Additionally, assuming that DHCP is handing out that address
> on the server that mask would likely not be all ones.
>
> Even Amazon EC2 instances use private addresses now on the backend ...
>
> Kind regards,
> Truman
>
>
> On 22/12/2009, at 11:31 PM, Deric Kwok wrote:
>
> > Hi Bruce
> >
> > Thank you so much to explain me in detail. I would like to know about
> > this it in case i can get another  hosting company
> >
> > Yes. I think the netmask should be 255.255.255.255
> > 1/ but why they are using this netmask setting? save ip address?
> > then does the router handle many routes in this setting?
> > 2/ What is this advantage for the hosting company?
> > 3/ If I need more ip in the same server, how it works?
> > 4/ Why you said the hosting company is cheap to use this configuration?
> >
> > Thank you again.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >>
> >> <SNIP>
> >> 2/ lf  the network card in server has problem and need change another
> >> one, will my ip address change to another ip address also?
> >> </SNIP>
> >> Yeah well thats how dhcp works, via ma caddy, i guess you can always
> spoof
> >> your old mac address.
> >>
> >> <SNIP>
> >> 3/ why hosting company is using /32 and dhcp? what is advantage? ls it
> >> easy for administration?
> >> </SNIP>
> >> Im guessing because the users are to stupid to understand what a subnet
> >> mask/gateway is its just easier to get the mac address and assign it to
> a
> >> user then let the user assign a ip.
> >>
> >>
> >> Normally in a co-location setup its not like this, inless its very cheap
> >> hosting.
> >>
> >> My co-location has the following setup, and this is how MOST networks
> should
> >> be run.
> >>
> >> Core router using BGP to transit providers, and other local peers.
> >> Switched network useing ospf to handle the routes and also VLAN's for
> the
> >> customers subnets.
> >>
> >> So customer should get a vlan assigned to them (which they have no need
> to
> >> know what the number is, they are handed a access mode port.
> >> Customers also issued a /30 (at least) in most cases a customer will get
> a
> >> /29 or /28 depending on what they need.
> >> In this case of a /30 its a total of 3 address's
> >> 1, GATEWAY (put on the ISP/HOST switch
> >> 2, IP ADDRESS FOR SERVER TO USE
> >> 3, BROADCAST ADDRESS.
> >>
> >> Heres an eg of a /30:
> >>
> >> Address:   192.168.1.1          11000000.10101000.00000001.000000 01
> >> Netmask:   255.255.255.252 = 30 11111111.11111111.11111111.111111 00
> >> Wildcard:  0.0.0.3              00000000.00000000.00000000.000000 11
> >> =>
> >> Network:   192.168.1.0/30       11000000.10101000.00000001.000000 00
> >> HostMin:   192.168.1.1          11000000.10101000.00000001.000000 01
> >> HostMax:   192.168.1.2          11000000.10101000.00000001.000000 10
> >> Broadcast: 192.168.1.3          11000000.10101000.00000001.000000 11
> >> Hosts/Net: 2                     Class C, Private Internet
> >>
> >>
> >> Heres an eg of a /29:
> >>
> >> the % ipcalc 192.168.1.1/29
> >> Address:   192.168.1.1          11000000.10101000.00000001.00000 001
> >> Netmask:   255.255.255.248 = 29 11111111.11111111.11111111.11111 000
> >> Wildcard:  0.0.0.7              00000000.00000000.00000000.00000 111
> >> =>
> >> Network:   192.168.1.0/29       11000000.10101000.00000001.00000 000
> >> HostMin:   192.168.1.1          11000000.10101000.00000001.00000 001
> >> HostMax:   192.168.1.6          11000000.10101000.00000001.00000 110
> >> Broadcast: 192.168.1.7          11000000.10101000.00000001.00000 111
> >> Hosts/Net: 6                     Class C, Private Internet
> >>
> >> Hope this makes sence.
> >>
> >> Regards,
> >>
> >> Bruce
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
>
>
>
>



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