Risk of Internet collapse grows

Sharif Torpis faust at grift.com
Wed Nov 27 08:50:48 UTC 2002


http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6V1H-461XHCP
-1&_user=10&_coverDate=02%2F28%2F2003&_rdoc=4&_fmt=summary&_orig=brows
e&_srch=%23toc%235675%232003%23999799998%23346577!&_cdi=5675&_sort=d&_
docanchor=&wchp=dGLbVzb-lSzBA&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=
0&_userid=10&md5=07d46c9a1f4d02e61db9a1aaff89514e

---
"Whenever I'm caught between two evils, I take the one I've never 
tried." - Mae West

On Wed, 27 Nov 2002 03:06:30 -0500 (EST), Sean Donelan wrote:
>
>On Tue, 26 Nov 2002, Irwin Lazar wrote:
>>Thought this might be worth passing on:
>>http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/2514651.stm
>><http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/2514651.stm>
>
>Its difficult to tell what the authors have discovered since the
>paper
>won't be published for four months.  From the press release I notice
>some language which would indicate it may have the same issues other
>Internet models have predicting the impact of physical disruptions.
>
>Q: What's the difference between airline traffic and highway traffic
>during a snow storm in Chicago?
>
>A: A snowstorm in Chicago doesn't have much of an impact on highway
>traffic through Dallas.  But a snowstorm in Chicago does impact air
>traffic in Dallas.
>
>Air traffic in the US is a tightly coupled system. Air traffic is
>coordinated nationally, and passengers must make connections at 
fixed
>points which are difficult to change.  Its difficult to get on a
>different
>plane heading in the general direction of your destination.
>Automotive
>traffic is loosly coupled.  Auto traffic is locally controlled and
>cars
>may be individually re-routed towards its destination at many
>different
>points.
>
>Which analogy is closer to what happens to the Internet?  Air
>traffic or
>highway traffic?  Or maybe Internet traffic is like Internet 
traffic.






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