Automated DLR conflict detection

Sean Donelan sean at donelan.com
Fri Dec 21 03:25:09 UTC 2001


The Wall Street Journal had an article Thursday about the problems
executives with large multi-national companies are having re-engineering
their telecommunication networks.  None of this should come as a
surprise to long-time readers of any of the networking lists.

   Just in Case, Many Firms Work to Set Up
   Redundant Telecommunications Systems
   By DENNIS K. BERMAN
   Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
   Thursday December 20 2001

   John Smiley typically wears suits. But as the executive in charge of
   telecommunications for Lufthansa Systems' North American operations, he
   recently put on jeans and work boots to inch his way into a dirty train
   tunnel beneath New York City's Grand Central Terminal.

   His mission: to inspect new fiber-optic cables that snake through
   abandoned gas pipes, ensuring that they are running on a safe, separate
   path from a set of nearby fibers carrying the German airline's
   reservations data.

I've done something similar in the past.

But it doesn't solve the problem.  Even if the sales person promises
you diversity, even if you physically inspect every meter of fiber,
even if you pay more, after six months your network won't be diverse.

On a long-term basis, how do you check carriers are keeping their
promises? Are there any commercial products which let subscribers
automatically check DLR's from carriers for changes and conflicts?
Since DLR's only show the active components in a circuit, has anyone
developed a product to check for passive and location risks?





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