5.7/5.8 GHz 802.11n dual polarity MIMO through office building glass, 1.5 km distance

Robert E. Seastrom rs at seastrom.com
Wed Dec 29 07:19:08 CST 2010


"Wayne E. Bouchard" <web at typo.org> writes:

> Codes are usually defined in one of two ways... Either "cannot be
> above the building parapet" or "cannot be visible from the street
> below" (which allows you to position a stant at the center of the roof
> so you can clear the parapet) but when talking to building management,
> it can very easily be, "can't put anything on the roof"
>
> So to be certain we're not missing an opportunity, do you know that
> you don't actually have the second of those definitions as an option?
> In my area, neighboring jurisdictions adopt either the first or the
> second with building management usually adopting the first and making
> my life difficult. (IE, can do it in one place but not on the
> companion building.)

The third consideration is "someone notices and cares".

The Nanostation Loco (again from Ubiquiti) is easily capable of the
distances that you're talking about and is an all-in-out unit (antenna
plus radio, fed with POE) about twice the size of a pack of cigarettes
(does anyone use that as a point of reference anymore or have enough
of us quit smoking that it's irrelevant?).  It has a built-in mount on
the back and is intended to be zip tied to an existing vent pipe or
mast.  They even include a zip tie in the packaging.

As someone else noted, it is cheaper to buy Ubiquiti equipment and see
if it works than it is to do the engineering.  In this case, it may
well be worth the investment to buy the Ubiquiti equipment and bring
it to a meeting with the building management folks to do some *social
engineering*.

Most of these regulations are centered on the concern that your
building not look like a tower site.  An antenna that is sufficiently
small that it can not be seen from the ground without resorting to
optics may be on their "oh, that's fine" list once they see one
sitting on the table in front of them. 

-r





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