Starting up a WiMAX ISP

Varaillon Jean Christophe j.varaillon at cosmoline.com
Thu Apr 29 08:58:39 CDT 2010


Hi,


Based on what the markets currently offers and what your potential customers
need, you can figure out the packages that you could to sell (Internet,
voip, vpn, guaranteed bandwidth...). This would give you the resources that
should be considered per customer. It would also give you a hint to select
the CPE (wifi, POTS, firewall...)

Then, it is necessary to locate, physically the area with the greatest
potential of getting customers. This would give an idea of where should the
base stations be located, how many customers would be aggregated at one Base
Station (having in mind how many customers will be connected concurrently)
and how much downlink traffic is to be expected.

In case you go for a model where the ASN-GW is centralized, all the traffic
has to go from each base station to the ASN-GW. The backhauling could be
done using Ethernet RF point-to-point link, re-using the mast where the
Wimax antenna is.

The ASN site, aggregates all the backhaul links into a switch, which then
connects to the ASN-GW (BRAS like). This is where the AAA, (DHCP), DNS, NTP,
NMS/EMS are also located.

In my opinion, the critical point really resides on the radio part (license,
authorization, legal complains, interferences...).


Jean-Christophe VARAILLON

-----Original Message-----
From: Alexander Harrowell [mailto:a.harrowell at gmail.com] 
Sent: Wednesday, April 28, 2010 2:29 PM
To: nanog at nanog.org
Subject: Re: Starting up a WiMAX ISP

On Wednesday 28 April 2010 03:13:24 John R. Levine wrote:
> > Of course what they offer over those "long long rural runs" and what 
> > they
can 
> > actually provide are two different things.  DSL performance 
> > decreases with distance rather dramatically..
> 
> That's what I thought, but my friend out on the sheep farm in the next 
> county says he gets 3Mb just like I do in the village three blocks 
> from the CO.  (Yes, he knows what he's talking about.)  They must 
> spend a lot on repeaters and concentrators.
> 
> R's,
> John
> 
> 

There is a great deal of relevant experience here: 
http://www.wirelesscowboys.com/
--
The only thing worse than e-mail disclaimers...is people who send e-mail to
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