NANOG Digest, Vol 16, Issue 60

Kesva Naidoo knaidoo at juniper.net
Fri May 15 13:30:10 CDT 2009


I would not like to punt another vendor's equipment but have you looked
at the MX-480 or MX-960. You would not have to worry about CPU
limitations and it is an Internet core box capable of handling all the
protocols.

Kesva


-----Original Message-----
From: nanog-request at nanog.org [mailto:nanog-request at nanog.org] 
Sent: Friday, May 15, 2009 2:16 PM
To: nanog at nanog.org
Subject: NANOG Digest, Vol 16, Issue 60

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Today's Topics:

   1. RE: NPE-G2 vs. Sup720-3BXL (Leland E. Vandervort)
   2. Re: NPE-G2 vs. Sup720-3BXL (Aaron Millisor)
   3. Re: NPE-G2 vs. Sup720-3BXL (Alex H. Ryu)
   4. Re: NPE-G2 vs. Sup720-3BXL (David Storandt)
   5. Re: you're not interesting,	was Re: another brick in the
      wall[ed garden] (Owen DeLong)
   6. RE: Managing your network devices via console (Dylan Ebner)
   7. Weekly Routing Table Report (Routing Analysis Role Account)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Fri, 15 May 2009 16:21:23 +0000 (GMT)
From: "Leland E. Vandervort" <leland at taranta.discpro.org>
Subject: RE: NPE-G2 vs. Sup720-3BXL
To: Paul Stewart <pstewart at nexicomgroup.net>
Cc: NANOG list <nanog at nanog.org>
Message-ID:
	<Pine.LNX.4.44.0905151611450.20125-100000 at taranta.discpro.org>
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII


We're running several six 65xx Sup720-3BXL with 3 full transit views and
some 40-odd peers.  We use two NPE-G1s for reflectors and some policy
manipulation.  Also running MPLS in the core to allow for traffic
engineering and EoMPLS between certain services located in different
locations.

We're pushing up to between 800M and 1G at peak times (mostly outbound)
with this setup and peak CPU on the 3BXLs is running maybe 30% --
average
though of around 8 to 10%.

Hope this helps....

side-note:

I'm actually more worried about the distribution layer at the moment as
it
relies heavily on STP and HSRP/GLBP for the various vlans and access
layer
gunk.  Currently these are 720-3B (non-XL), but looking eventually to
build a business case to upgrade these to VSS1440 to simplify the
architecture as well as providing better resilience and elimination of
STP/HSRP/GLBP limitations between the dist and access layers.  Problem
is
the budget side of that... blargh!

Ideally I'd like to go more for the Nexus platform for this part of the
network, given that we're doing a lot of virtualisation etc., but the
downsides with that are primarily the COST of the bloody things, and
secondly the fact that they don't currently support MPLS (planned for
later this year, apparently).

Leland






On Fri, 15 May 2009, Paul Stewart wrote:

> We've never pushed a NPE-G2 to 800Mb/s before but I would think they
> would topple over... hopefully someone on here could confirm my
> statement?
>
> Moving the BGP to the 12008's would be my choice with PRP-2 processors
> if the budget fits.... we're faced with a similar upgrade next year
> possibly moving BGP from a pair of 7606's (Sup720-3BXL) over to a pair
> of GSR's running PRP2 I think - the BGP processing etc. is pushing the
> CPU's too high on the 7600's....
>
> Someone else might suggest the RSP720's but haven't had them in a
> production environment yet...  we had PRP2's running on 12012 for a
> while and found them rock solid even with older line cards etc...
>
> Hope this helps a bit...;)
>
> Paul
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: David Storandt [mailto:dstorandt at teljet.com]
> Sent: Friday, May 15, 2009 11:08 AM
> To: NANOG list
> Subject: NPE-G2 vs. Sup720-3BXL
>
> We're stuck in an engineering pickle, so some experience from this
> crew would be useful in tie-breaking...
>
> We operate a business-grade FTTx ISP with ~75 customers and 800Mbps of
> Internet traffic, currently using 6509/Sup2s for core routing and port
> aggregation. The MSFC2s are under stress from 3x full route feeds,
> pared down to 85% to fit the TCAM tables. One system has a FlexWAN
> with an OC3 card and it's crushing the CPU on the MSFC2. System tuning
> (stable IOS and esp. disabling SPD) helped a lot but still doesn't
> have the power to pull through. Hardware upgrades are needed...
>
> We need true full routes and more CPU horsepower for crunching BGP
> (+12 smaller peers + ISIS). OC3 interfaces are going to be mandatory,
> one each at two locations. Oh yeah, we're still a larger startup
> without endless pockets. Power, rack space, and SmartNet are not
> concerns at any location (on-site cold spares). We may need an
> upstream OC12 in the future but that's a ways out and not a concern
> here.
>
> Our engineering team has settled on three $20k/node options:
> - Sup720-3BXLs with PS and fan upgrades
> - Sup2s as switches + ISIS + statics and no BGP, push BGP edge routing
> off to NPE-G2s across a 2-3Gbps port-channel
> - Sup2s as switches + ISIS + statics and no BGP, push BGP edge routing
> off to a 12008 with E3 engines across a 2-3Gbps port-channel.
>
> Ideas and constructive opinions welcome, especially software and
> stability-related.
>
> Many thanks,
> -Dave
>
>
>
>
>
>
------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
>
> "The information transmitted is intended only for the person or entity
to which it is addressed and contains confidential and/or privileged
material. If you received this in error, please contact the sender
immediately and then destroy this transmission, including all
attachments, without copying, distributing or disclosing same. Thank
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>
>




------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Fri, 15 May 2009 12:44:18 -0400
From: Aaron Millisor <aaron.millisor at bright.net>
Subject: Re: NPE-G2 vs. Sup720-3BXL
To: David Storandt <dstorandt at teljet.com>
Cc: NANOG list <nanog at nanog.org>
Message-ID: <4A0D9BE2.4030701 at bright.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed

We ran into a similar quandary and have about the same amount of traffic
as your 
network. When purchasing gear a year ago we decided against 7200's with
an 
NPE-G2 as insufficient for the load.  Have you looked at the 7304?

The Cisco 7304 with an NSE-150 processing engine on it offloads a lot of
the 
packet processing to dedicated hardware, and doesn't have TCAM
limitations for 
routes. You can hold several full feeds and do the amount of traffic
you're 
talking about without breaking a sweat.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/routers/ps352/prod_bulletin09
00aecd8060aac5.html

It is capable of supporting both legacy port adapters (from your Flexwan
or 7200 
routers) and SPA cards with the right add-in modules, which IIRC is only
a few 
hundred dollars.

I'd be glad to answer any questions you have about our implementation.

--am

David Storandt wrote:
> We're stuck in an engineering pickle, so some experience from this
> crew would be useful in tie-breaking...
> 
> We operate a business-grade FTTx ISP with ~75 customers and 800Mbps of
> Internet traffic, currently using 6509/Sup2s for core routing and port
> aggregation. The MSFC2s are under stress from 3x full route feeds,
> pared down to 85% to fit the TCAM tables. One system has a FlexWAN
> with an OC3 card and it's crushing the CPU on the MSFC2. System tuning
> (stable IOS and esp. disabling SPD) helped a lot but still doesn't
> have the power to pull through. Hardware upgrades are needed...
> 
> We need true full routes and more CPU horsepower for crunching BGP
> (+12 smaller peers + ISIS). OC3 interfaces are going to be mandatory,
> one each at two locations. Oh yeah, we're still a larger startup
> without endless pockets. Power, rack space, and SmartNet are not
> concerns at any location (on-site cold spares). We may need an
> upstream OC12 in the future but that's a ways out and not a concern
> here.
> 
> Our engineering team has settled on three $20k/node options:
> - Sup720-3BXLs with PS and fan upgrades
> - Sup2s as switches + ISIS + statics and no BGP, push BGP edge routing
> off to NPE-G2s across a 2-3Gbps port-channel
> - Sup2s as switches + ISIS + statics and no BGP, push BGP edge routing
> off to a 12008 with E3 engines across a 2-3Gbps port-channel.
> 
> Ideas and constructive opinions welcome, especially software and
> stability-related.
> 
> Many thanks,
> -Dave



------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Fri, 15 May 2009 11:51:50 -0500
From: "Alex H. Ryu" <r.hyunseog at ieee.org>
Subject: Re: NPE-G2 vs. Sup720-3BXL
To: Aaron Millisor <aaron.millisor at bright.net>
Cc: NANOG list <nanog at nanog.org>
Message-ID: <4A0D9DA6.9020604 at ieee.org>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=EUC-KR

Cisco 7304 may not adequate for service provider.
It's CPU/IO-controller is tied together, and doesn't provide much of
benefit.

Cisco 7200/7300 is enterprise solution pretty much, and doesn't support
distributed CEF.

If you are considering SUP720-3BXL, why not considering RSP720-3CXL ?

Alex


Aaron Millisor wrote:
> We ran into a similar quandary and have about the same amount of
> traffic as your network. When purchasing gear a year ago we decided
> against 7200's with an NPE-G2 as insufficient for the load. Have you
> looked at the 7304?
>
> The Cisco 7304 with an NSE-150 processing engine on it offloads a lot
> of the packet processing to dedicated hardware, and doesn't have TCAM
> limitations for routes. You can hold several full feeds and do the
> amount of traffic you're talking about without breaking a sweat.
>
>
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/routers/ps352/prod_bulletin09
00aecd8060aac5.html
>
>
> It is capable of supporting both legacy port adapters (from your
> Flexwan or 7200 routers) and SPA cards with the right add-in modules,
> which IIRC is only a few hundred dollars.
>
> I'd be glad to answer any questions you have about our implementation.
>
> --am
>
> David Storandt wrote:
>> We're stuck in an engineering pickle, so some experience from this
>> crew would be useful in tie-breaking...
>>
>> We operate a business-grade FTTx ISP with ~75 customers and 800Mbps
of
>> Internet traffic, currently using 6509/Sup2s for core routing and
port
>> aggregation. The MSFC2s are under stress from 3x full route feeds,
>> pared down to 85% to fit the TCAM tables. One system has a FlexWAN
>> with an OC3 card and it's crushing the CPU on the MSFC2. System
tuning
>> (stable IOS and esp. disabling SPD) helped a lot but still doesn't
>> have the power to pull through. Hardware upgrades are needed...
>>
>> We need true full routes and more CPU horsepower for crunching BGP
>> (+12 smaller peers + ISIS). OC3 interfaces are going to be mandatory,
>> one each at two locations. Oh yeah, we're still a larger startup
>> without endless pockets. Power, rack space, and SmartNet are not
>> concerns at any location (on-site cold spares). We may need an
>> upstream OC12 in the future but that's a ways out and not a concern
>> here.
>>
>> Our engineering team has settled on three $20k/node options:
>> - Sup720-3BXLs with PS and fan upgrades
>> - Sup2s as switches + ISIS + statics and no BGP, push BGP edge
routing
>> off to NPE-G2s across a 2-3Gbps port-channel
>> - Sup2s as switches + ISIS + statics and no BGP, push BGP edge
routing
>> off to a 12008 with E3 engines across a 2-3Gbps port-channel.
>>
>> Ideas and constructive opinions welcome, especially software and
>> stability-related.
>>
>> Many thanks,
>> -Dave
>
>
>




------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Fri, 15 May 2009 13:23:08 -0400
From: David Storandt <dstorandt at teljet.com>
Subject: Re: NPE-G2 vs. Sup720-3BXL
To: "Alex H. Ryu" <r.hyunseog at ieee.org>
Cc: NANOG list <nanog at nanog.org>
Message-ID:
	<f52f476c0905151023qf092b37nd489ceaa1262ed1e at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

I would love to use the RSP720-3CXL, but cost and the PA OC3 are the
difficulties.

If the RSP720s will run in a 6500 chassis, great! We wouldn't have to
purchase new chassis and the increased downtime for the swap-out.

RSP720 don't support the older bus-only FlexWAN either with the OC3 PA
we're using, so we'd have to figure out a solution for that - SIPs,
Enhanced FlexWAN, or external routers. Bah.

...the RSP720s + chassis + OC3 solution more than double our $20k/node
budget, so that's a much tougher sell internally.

-Dave


2009/5/15 Alex H. Ryu <r.hyunseog at ieee.org>:
> Cisco 7304 may not adequate for service provider.
> It's CPU/IO-controller is tied together, and doesn't provide much of
> benefit.
>
> Cisco 7200/7300 is enterprise solution pretty much, and doesn't
support
> distributed CEF.
>
> If you are considering SUP720-3BXL, why not considering RSP720-3CXL ?
>
> Alex
>
>
> Aaron Millisor wrote:
>> We ran into a similar quandary and have about the same amount of
>> traffic as your network. When purchasing gear a year ago we decided
>> against 7200's with an NPE-G2 as insufficient for the load. Have you
>> looked at the 7304?
>>
>> The Cisco 7304 with an NSE-150 processing engine on it offloads a lot
>> of the packet processing to dedicated hardware, and doesn't have TCAM
>> limitations for routes. You can hold several full feeds and do the
>> amount of traffic you're talking about without breaking a sweat.
>>
>>
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/routers/ps352/prod_bulletin09
00aecd8060aac5.html
>>
>>
>> It is capable of supporting both legacy port adapters (from your
>> Flexwan or 7200 routers) and SPA cards with the right add-in modules,
>> which IIRC is only a few hundred dollars.
>>
>> I'd be glad to answer any questions you have about our
implementation.
>>
>> --am
>>
>> David Storandt wrote:
>>> We're stuck in an engineering pickle, so some experience from this
>>> crew would be useful in tie-breaking...
>>>
>>> We operate a business-grade FTTx ISP with ~75 customers and 800Mbps
of
>>> Internet traffic, currently using 6509/Sup2s for core routing and
port
>>> aggregation. The MSFC2s are under stress from 3x full route feeds,
>>> pared down to 85% to fit the TCAM tables. One system has a FlexWAN
>>> with an OC3 card and it's crushing the CPU on the MSFC2. System
tuning
>>> (stable IOS and esp. disabling SPD) helped a lot but still doesn't
>>> have the power to pull through. Hardware upgrades are needed...
>>>
>>> We need true full routes and more CPU horsepower for crunching BGP
>>> (+12 smaller peers + ISIS). OC3 interfaces are going to be
mandatory,
>>> one each at two locations. Oh yeah, we're still a larger startup
>>> without endless pockets. Power, rack space, and SmartNet are not
>>> concerns at any location (on-site cold spares). We may need an
>>> upstream OC12 in the future but that's a ways out and not a concern
>>> here.
>>>
>>> Our engineering team has settled on three $20k/node options:
>>> - Sup720-3BXLs with PS and fan upgrades
>>> - Sup2s as switches + ISIS + statics and no BGP, push BGP edge
routing
>>> off to NPE-G2s across a 2-3Gbps port-channel
>>> - Sup2s as switches + ISIS + statics and no BGP, push BGP edge
routing
>>> off to a 12008 with E3 engines across a 2-3Gbps port-channel.
>>>
>>> Ideas and constructive opinions welcome, especially software and
>>> stability-related.
>>>
>>> Many thanks,
>>> -Dave
>>
>>
>>
>
>



------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Fri, 15 May 2009 10:34:14 -0700
From: Owen DeLong <owen at delong.com>
Subject: Re: you're not interesting,	was Re: another brick in the
	wall[ed garden]
To: Mans Nilsson <mansaxel at besserwisser.org>
Cc: Mark Andrews <Mark_Andrews at isc.org>, nanog at nanog.org,
	rs at seastrom.com
Message-ID: <9D559FD4-F4C4-48F8-9385-CAB92C0AD863 at delong.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed; delsp=yes


On May 14, 2009, at 10:07 PM, Mans Nilsson wrote:

> Subject: Re: you're not interesting, was Re: another brick in the  
> wall[ed garden] Date: Fri, May 15, 2009 at 09:58:32AM +1000 Quoting  
> Mark Andrews (Mark_Andrews at isc.org):
>> 	And what's the next protocol that is going to be stomped on?
>
> Anything except http; at which point everything will move to http, and
> the firewalls are again useless.
>
This is, indeed, already happening.  In fact, I'm running an SMTP server
with TLS on port 80 to get around SPRINT's existing braindamage.

(or at least the braindamage they had at one point).

Owen

> -- 
> M?ns Nilsson		
>
>




------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Fri, 15 May 2009 12:04:47 -0600
From: "Dylan Ebner" <dylan.ebner at crlmed.com>
Subject: RE: Managing your network devices via console
To: "Mehmet Akcin" <mehmet at akcin.net>
Cc: nanog at nanog.org
Message-ID:
	<6286FF05EBE33C4596F6C6C23762686701FCE20B at VS11.EXCHPROD.USA.NET>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="us-ascii"

We use Cyclades (avocent) devices in our data center. They have worked
great for us. Very reliable. Modem dial-in gives us great remote
capabilities if we have a major outage. We had troubles initially
getting them to work because the cable adapters were never pinned
correctly for Cisco. We ended up making our own rolled rj45-rj45 cables.
IIRC, this was a ton of work as you need to do some funky 2 wires in one
position stuff. 

We also use Cisco 2500's with modem on the aux and an octo-cable for the
devices. This works well too, but not as nice of an interface as the
Cyclades. No special cables needed though.

For power we have been using APC Managed PDU's. These have been
fantastic. No compaints.

 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Mehmet Akcin [mailto:mehmet at akcin.net] 
Sent: Thursday, May 14, 2009 9:30 PM
To: nanog at nanog.org
Subject: Managing your network devices via console

Hello,

It's always cool to have console access to routers/switches and nowadays
they are going from RS-232 to RJ-45 as a standart. I have got Avocent
DSR 2035 which is a KVM+Serial console (all in one).. but while I was
able to have it work against servers via KVM or/and Serial , I was
unable to make it work properly against any network device. I am
wondering if anyone had experience on DSR or similar boxes to configure
them against network devices console ports.

Making suggestions for alternative ways of centralizing network device
console management is also more than welcome, I guess the old fashioned
server attached usb-serial console is one of the most preferred way, but
feel free to provide if  you have good ideas

cheers

--
Mehmet





------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Sat, 16 May 2009 04:15:49 +1000 (EST)
From: Routing Analysis Role Account <cscora at apnic.net>
Subject: Weekly Routing Table Report
To: apops at apops.net, nanog at nanog.org, routing-wg at ripe.net,
	afnog at afnog.org,	ausnog at ausnog.net, sanog at sanog.org
Message-ID: <200905151815.n4FIFnE5005086 at thyme.apnic.net>

This is an automated weekly mailing describing the state of the Internet
Routing Table as seen from APNIC's router in Japan.
Daily listings are sent to bgp-stats at lists.apnic.net

For historical data, please see http://thyme.apnic.net.

If you have any comments please contact Philip Smith <pfs at cisco.com>.

Routing Table Report   04:00 +10GMT Sat 16 May, 2009

Report Website:     http://thyme.apnic.net
Detailed Analysis:  http://thyme.apnic.net/current/

Analysis Summary
----------------

BGP routing table entries examined:                              288509
    Prefixes after maximum aggregation:                          136412
    Deaggregation factor:                                          2.11
    Unique aggregates announced to Internet:                     141329
Total ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:                 31265
    Prefixes per ASN:                                              9.23
Origin-only ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:           27181
Origin ASes announcing only one prefix:                           13271
Transit ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:                4084
Transit-only ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:             93
Average AS path length visible in the Internet Routing Table:       3.6
    Max AS path length visible:                                      33
    Max AS path prepend of ASN (43683)                               31
Prefixes from unregistered ASNs in the Routing Table:               464
    Unregistered ASNs in the Routing Table:                         151
Number of 32-bit ASNs allocated by the RIRs:                        144
Prefixes from 32-bit ASNs in the Routing Table:                      33
Special use prefixes present in the Routing Table:                    0
Prefixes being announced from unallocated address space:            217
Number of addresses announced to Internet:                   2045653328
    Equivalent to 121 /8s, 238 /16s and 49 /24s
    Percentage of available address space announced:               55.2
    Percentage of allocated address space announced:               63.9
    Percentage of available address space allocated:               86.4
    Percentage of address space in use by end-sites:               77.0
Total number of prefixes smaller than registry allocations:      142688

APNIC Region Analysis Summary
-----------------------------

Prefixes being announced by APNIC Region ASes:                    67654
    Total APNIC prefixes after maximum aggregation:               24179
    APNIC Deaggregation factor:                                    2.80
Prefixes being announced from the APNIC address blocks:           64332
    Unique aggregates announced from the APNIC address blocks:    29021
APNIC Region origin ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:    3628
    APNIC Prefixes per ASN:                                       17.73
APNIC Region origin ASes announcing only one prefix:                990
APNIC Region transit ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:    559
Average APNIC Region AS path length visible:                        3.5
    Max APNIC Region AS path length visible:                         18
Number of APNIC addresses announced to Internet:              413775280
    Equivalent to 24 /8s, 169 /16s and 181 /24s
    Percentage of available APNIC address space announced:         77.1

APNIC AS Blocks        4608-4864, 7467-7722, 9216-10239, 17408-18431
(pre-ERX allocations)  23552-24575, 37888-38911, 45056-46079
APNIC Address Blocks    58/8,  59/8,  60/8,  61/8, 110/8, 111/8, 112/8,
                       113/8, 114/8, 115/8, 116/8, 117/8, 118/8, 119/8,
                       120/8, 121/8, 122/8, 123/8, 124/8, 125/8, 126/8,
                       180/8, 183/8, 202/8, 203/8, 210/8, 211/8, 218/8,
                       219/8, 220/8, 221/8, 222/8,

ARIN Region Analysis Summary
----------------------------

Prefixes being announced by ARIN Region ASes:                    125540
    Total ARIN prefixes after maximum aggregation:                66187
    ARIN Deaggregation factor:                                     1.90
Prefixes being announced from the ARIN address blocks:            94652
    Unique aggregates announced from the ARIN address blocks:     36596
ARIN Region origin ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:    12997
    ARIN Prefixes per ASN:                                         7.28
ARIN Region origin ASes announcing only one prefix:                5002
ARIN Region transit ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:    1272
Average ARIN Region AS path length visible:                         3.3
    Max ARIN Region AS path length visible:                          24
Number of ARIN addresses announced to Internet:               428644608
    Equivalent to 25 /8s, 140 /16s and 153 /24s
    Percentage of available ARIN address space announced:          82.4

ARIN AS Blocks         1-1876, 1902-2042, 2044-2046, 2048-2106
(pre-ERX allocations)  2138-2584, 2615-2772, 2823-2829, 2880-3153
                       3354-4607, 4865-5119, 5632-6655, 6912-7466
                       7723-8191, 10240-12287, 13312-15359, 16384-17407
                       18432-20479, 21504-23551, 25600-26591,
                       26624-27647, 29696-30719, 31744-33791
                       35840-36863, 39936-40959, 46080-47103
                       53248-55295
ARIN Address Blocks     24/8,  63/8,  64/8,  65/8,  66/8,  67/8,  68/8,
                        69/8,  70/8,  71/8,  72/8,  73/8,  74/8,  75/8,
                        76/8,  96/8,  97/8,  98/8,  99/8, 108/8, 173/8,
                       174/8, 184/8, 199/8, 204/8, 205/8, 206/8, 207/8,
                       208/8, 209/8, 216/8,

RIPE Region Analysis Summary
----------------------------

Prefixes being announced by RIPE Region ASes:                     66135
    Total RIPE prefixes after maximum aggregation:                38352
    RIPE Deaggregation factor:                                     1.72
Prefixes being announced from the RIPE address blocks:            60448
    Unique aggregates announced from the RIPE address blocks:     40229
RIPE Region origin ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:    13009
    RIPE Prefixes per ASN:                                         4.65
RIPE Region origin ASes announcing only one prefix:                6825
RIPE Region transit ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:    1961
Average RIPE Region AS path length visible:                         4.0
    Max RIPE Region AS path length visible:                          33
Number of RIPE addresses announced to Internet:               393701408
    Equivalent to 23 /8s, 119 /16s and 104 /24s
    Percentage of available RIPE address space announced:          83.8

RIPE AS Blocks         1877-1901, 2043, 2047, 2107-2136, 2585-2614
(pre-ERX allocations)  2773-2822, 2830-2879, 3154-3353, 5377-5631
                       6656-6911, 8192-9215, 12288-13311, 15360-16383
                       20480-21503, 24576-25599, 28672-29695
                       30720-31743, 33792-35839, 38912-39935
                       40960-45055, 47104-52223
RIPE Address Blocks     62/8,  77/8,  78/8,  79/8,  80/8,  81/8,  82/8,
                        83/8,  84/8,  85/8,  86/8,  87/8,  88/8,  89/8,
                        90/8,  91/8,  92/8,  93/8,  94/8,  95/8, 109/8,
                       178/8, 193/8, 194/8, 195/8, 212/8, 213/8, 217/8,
                      

LACNIC Region Analysis Summary
------------------------------

Prefixes being announced by LACNIC Region ASes:                   23824
    Total LACNIC prefixes after maximum aggregation:               5887
    LACNIC Deaggregation factor:                                   4.05
Prefixes being announced from the LACNIC address blocks:          21985
    Unique aggregates announced from the LACNIC address blocks:   12186
LACNIC Region origin ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:   1107
    LACNIC Prefixes per ASN:                                      19.86
LACNIC Region origin ASes announcing only one prefix:               362
LACNIC Region transit ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:   187
Average LACNIC Region AS path length visible:                       4.1
    Max LACNIC Region AS path length visible:                        19
Number of LACNIC addresses announced to Internet:              63251840
    Equivalent to 3 /8s, 197 /16s and 37 /24s
    Percentage of available LACNIC address space announced:        62.8

LACNIC AS Blocks       26592-26623, 27648-28671, 52224-53247
                       plus ERX transfers
LACNIC Address Blocks  186/8, 187/8, 189/8, 190/8, 200/8, 201/8,

AfriNIC Region Analysis Summary
-------------------------------

Prefixes being announced by AfriNIC Region ASes:                   4925
    Total AfriNIC prefixes after maximum aggregation:              1468
    AfriNIC Deaggregation factor:                                  3.35
Prefixes being announced from the AfriNIC address blocks:          4540
    Unique aggregates announced from the AfriNIC address blocks:   1384
AfriNIC Region origin ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:   299
    AfriNIC Prefixes per ASN:                                     15.18
AfriNIC Region origin ASes announcing only one prefix:               92
AfriNIC Region transit ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:   60
Average AfriNIC Region AS path length visible:                      3.9
    Max AfriNIC Region AS path length visible:                       18
Number of AfriNIC addresses announced to Internet:             11359232
    Equivalent to 0 /8s, 173 /16s and 84 /24s
    Percentage of available AfriNIC address space announced:       33.9

AfriNIC AS Blocks      36864-37887 & ERX transfers
AfriNIC Address Blocks  41/8, 197/8,

APNIC Region per AS prefix count summary
----------------------------------------

  ASN   No of nets  /20 equiv  MaxAgg  Description
 4766     1698       6930         403   Korea Telecom (KIX)
17488     1584        128         104   Hathway IP Over Cable Interne
 4755     1247        466         128   TATA Communications formerly 
 9583     1079         86         541   Sify Limited
 4134      887      16660         372   CHINANET-BACKBONE
23577      780         34         662   Korea Telecom (ATM-MPLS)
 7545      772        198         103   TPG Internet Pty Ltd
18101      754        217          32   Reliance Infocom Ltd Internet
24560      689        229         179   Bharti Airtel Ltd.
 9829      670        561          14   BSNL National Internet Backbo

Complete listing at http://thyme.apnic.net/current/data-ASnet-APNIC

ARIN Region per AS prefix count summary
---------------------------------------

  ASN   No of nets  /20 equiv  MaxAgg  Description
 6389     4296       3647         324   bellsouth.net, inc. 
  209     2560       4149         607   Qwest 
 4323     1848       1035         373   Time Warner Telecom
 1785     1759        717         139   PaeTec Communications, Inc.
20115     1627       1444         720   Charter Communications 
 7018     1490       5914        1024   AT&T WorldNet Services
 6478     1404        310         400   AT&T Worldnet Services 
 2386     1262        697         915   AT&T Data Communications Serv
 3356     1224      10981         461   Level 3 Communications, LLC 
11492     1099        192          11   Cable One 

Complete listing at http://thyme.apnic.net/current/data-ASnet-ARIN

RIPE Region per AS prefix count summary
---------------------------------------

  ASN   No of nets  /20 equiv  MaxAgg  Description
 8452     1200        188           7   TEDATA
30890      542         88         201   Evolva Telecom
 3292      455       1893         393   TDC Tele Danmark
12479      449        578           6   Uni2 Autonomous System
 8866      382        110          24   Bulgarian Telecommunication C
 3320      349       7082         300   Deutsche Telekom AG
 3215      343       3041         108   France Telecom Transpac
 3301      340       1668         304   TeliaNet Sweden
35805      328         24           4   United Telecom of Georgia
29049      316         26           3   AzerSat LLC.

Complete listing at http://thyme.apnic.net/current/data-ASnet-RIPE

LACNIC Region per AS prefix count summary
-----------------------------------------

  ASN   No of nets  /20 equiv  MaxAgg  Description
 8151     1449       2862         231   UniNet S.A. de C.V. 
10620      906        207         108   TVCABLE BOGOTA 
22047      610        302          14   VTR PUNTO NET S.A. 
 7303      529        274          75   Telecom Argentina Stet-France
11830      516        294          34   Instituto Costarricense de El
28573      464        562          26   NET Servicos de Comunicao S.A
 6471      443         96          32   ENTEL CHILE S.A. 
11172      443        102          72   Servicios Alestra S.A de C.V 
 7738      397        794          28   Telecomunicacoes da Bahia S.A
 3816      351        163          74   Empresa Nacional de Telecomun

Complete listing at http://thyme.apnic.net/current/data-ASnet-LACNIC

AfriNIC Region per AS prefix count summary
------------------------------------------

  ASN   No of nets  /20 equiv  MaxAgg  Description
24863      860         79          37   LINKdotNET AS number
20858      308         34           5   This AS will be used to conne
 3741      278        860         238   The Internet Solution 
 2018      243        215         143   Tertiary Education Network 
 6713      160        151          12   Itissalat Al-MAGHRIB
29571      139         15           9   Ci Telecom Autonomous system 
 5536      123          8           9   Internet Egypt Network
33776      116          6           7   Starcomms Nigeria Limited
 5713      113        507          64   Telkom SA Ltd 
24835      107         46           9   RAYA Telecom - Egypt

Complete listing at http://thyme.apnic.net/current/data-ASnet-AFRINIC

Global Per AS prefix count summary
----------------------------------

  ASN   No of nets  /20 equiv  MaxAgg  Description
 6389     4296       3647         324   bellsouth.net, inc. 
  209     2560       4149         607   Qwest 
 4323     1848       1035         373   Time Warner Telecom
 1785     1759        717         139   PaeTec Communications, Inc.
 4766     1698       6930         403   Korea Telecom (KIX)
20115     1627       1444         720   Charter Communications 
17488     1584        128         104   Hathway IP Over Cable Interne
 7018     1490       5914        1024   AT&T WorldNet Services
 8151     1449       2862         231   UniNet S.A. de C.V. 
 6478     1404        310         400   AT&T Worldnet Services 

Complete listing at http://thyme.apnic.net/current/data-ASnet

Global Per AS Maximum Aggr summary
----------------------------------

  ASN   No of nets  Net Savings Description
  209      2560        1953      Qwest 
 1785      1759        1620      PaeTec Communications, Inc.
17488      1584        1480      Hathway IP Over Cable Interne
 4323      1848        1475      Time Warner Telecom
 4766      1698        1295      Korea Telecom (KIX)
 8151      1449        1218      UniNet S.A. de C.V. 
 8452      1200        1193      TEDATA
 4755      1247        1119      TATA Communications formerly 
11492      1099        1088      Cable One 
18566      1062        1052      Covad Communications 

Complete listing at http://thyme.apnic.net/current/data-CIDRnet

List of Unregistered Origin ASNs (Global)
-----------------------------------------

Bad AS  Designation  Network              Transit AS  Description
16927   UNALLOCATED   12.0.252.0/23         7018       AT&T WorldNet
Servic
15132   UNALLOCATED   12.9.150.0/24         7018       AT&T WorldNet
Servic
32567   UNALLOCATED   12.14.170.0/24        7018       AT&T WorldNet
Servic
13746   UNALLOCATED   12.24.56.0/24         7018       AT&T WorldNet
Servic
32567   UNALLOCATED   12.25.107.0/24        7018       AT&T WorldNet
Servic
26973   UNALLOCATED   12.39.152.0/24        7018       AT&T WorldNet
Servic
26973   UNALLOCATED   12.39.154.0/23        7018       AT&T WorldNet
Servic
26973   UNALLOCATED   12.39.159.0/24        7018       AT&T WorldNet
Servic
32326   UNALLOCATED   12.40.49.0/24         7018       AT&T WorldNet
Servic
25639   UNALLOCATED   12.41.169.0/24        7018       AT&T WorldNet
Servic

Complete listing at http://thyme.apnic.net/current/data-badAS

Advertised Unallocated Addresses
--------------------------------

Network            Origin AS  Description
24.246.0.0/17         7018     AT&T WorldNet Services
24.246.128.0/18       7018     AT&T WorldNet Services
41.223.112.0/22       5713     Telkom SA Ltd 
41.223.176.0/22      36981     >>UNKNOWN<<
41.223.188.0/24      22351     Intelsat 
41.223.189.0/24      26452     Local Communications Networks
62.61.220.0/24       24974     Tachyon Europe BV - Wireless 
62.61.221.0/24       24974     Tachyon Europe BV - Wireless 
63.140.213.0/24      22555     Universal Talkware Corporatio
63.143.251.0/24      22555     Universal Talkware Corporatio

Complete listing at http://thyme.apnic.net/current/data-add-IANA

Number of prefixes announced per prefix length (Global)
-------------------------------------------------------

 /1:0        /2:0        /3:0        /4:0        /5:0        /6:0       
 /7:0        /8:19       /9:10      /10:21      /11:58      /12:166     
/13:339     /14:597     /15:1148    /16:10461   /17:4739    /18:8141    
/19:17145   /20:20411   /21:20300   /22:25974   /23:25603   /24:150667  
/25:901     /26:1046    /27:547     /28:161     /29:37      /30:10      
/31:0       /32:8       

Advertised prefixes smaller than registry allocations
-----------------------------------------------------

  ASN   No of nets  Total ann.   Description
 6389     2802          4296      bellsouth.net, inc. 
 4766     1389          1698      Korea Telecom (KIX)
17488     1307          1584      Hathway IP Over Cable Interne
  209     1297          2560      Qwest 
 8452     1170          1200      TEDATA
 1785     1164          1759      PaeTec Communications, Inc.
18566     1043          1062      Covad Communications 
11492     1035          1099      Cable One 
 2386      970          1262      AT&T Data Communications Serv
 4323      951          1848      Time Warner Telecom

Complete listing at http://thyme.apnic.net/current/data/sXXas-nos

Number of /24s announced per /8 block (Global)
----------------------------------------------

   4:12        8:199      12:2227     13:10       15:19       16:3      
  17:4        20:35       24:1068     32:50       38:533      40:97     
  41:1952     43:1        44:2        47:22       52:4        55:2      
  56:3        57:25       58:581      59:642      60:459      61:1094   
  62:1097     63:2087     64:3690     65:2392     66:3595     67:1622   
  68:766      69:2605     70:532      71:146      72:1653     73:2      
  74:1527     75:172      76:310      77:841      78:562      79:329    
  80:977      81:804      82:526      83:430      84:615      85:1050   
  86:407      87:653      88:355      89:1440     90:57       91:2204   
  92:322      93:1011     94:1196     95:1217     96:124      97:208    
  98:218      99:22      109:1       110:119     112:120     113:104    
 114:256     115:288     116:1160    117:517     118:293     119:694    
 120:142     121:723     122:1019    123:674     124:955     125:1319   
 128:220     129:234     130:126     131:413     132:73      133:9      
 134:187     135:213     136:242     137:155     138:160     139:80     
 140:445     141:109     142:380     143:342     144:360     145:47     
 146:376     147:153     148:518     149:237     150:177     151:198    
 152:147     153:139     154:2       155:274     156:169     157:297    
 158:115     159:312     160:282     161:138     162:268     163:151    
 164:481     165:503     166:275     167:363     168:685     169:166    
 170:477     171:40      172:10      173:281     174:210     178:1      
 186:14      187:89      188:17      189:351     190:2631    192:5812   
 193:4218    194:3299    195:2698    196:1066    198:3662    199:3351   
 200:5305    201:1356    202:7838    203:8198    204:3815    205:2143   
 206:2458    207:2814    208:3913    209:3425    210:2659    211:1114   
 212:1521    213:1673    214:76      215:30      216:4651    217:1259   
 218:371     219:427     220:1214    221:472     222:295    

End of report



------------------------------

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