two interfaces one subnet

David Devereaux-Weber ddevereauxweber at gmail.com
Mon May 11 17:08:45 CDT 2009


In my case, each Ethernet interface has its own unique MAC address.

Dave

On Mon, May 11, 2009 at 4:28 PM, Hector Herrera <hectorherrera at gmail.com>wrote:

> On Mon, May 11, 2009 at 2:22 PM, David Devereaux-Weber
> <ddevereauxweber at gmail.com> wrote:
> > Chris,
> >
> > I work with iHDTV <http://ihdtv.org>, a project that sends uncompressed
> high
> > definition television (1.5 Gbps) as UDP over two 1 Gbps interfaces.  If
> both
> > interfaces are on the same subnet, the OS sees the same router (gateway)
> > address on both interfaces, and the results are sub-optimal ... around
> 50%
> > packet loss.
>
> packet loss is probably due to the network switch having to re-learn
> the location of the MAC address constantly as it sees packets on two
> or more ports with the same MAC address (think STP loops).
>
> If your network stack and network device (switch) supports LACP, then
> you can have multiple connections between a host and a network device.
>  That is a very easy way to increase capacity and add redundancy.
>
> That is how all of our VMWare ESX 3.5i servers are connected.
>
> Hector
>



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